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The Scan

Florida Politics reports Florida's law barring life, long-term care, and disability insurers from using genetic information in coverage decisions went into effect at the beginning of July.

The Washington Post reports on researchers' efforts to determine the effect of an increasingly common SARS-CoV-2 mutation.

A new analysis finds a link between popular media coverage of a scientific study and how often that paper is cited.

In Nature this week: CRISPR approaches to editing plant genomes, way to speed up DNA-PAINT, and more.

Researchers report on a concerning strain of the H1N1 swine flu virus found among pigs in China, Agence France Presse reports.

Memo Roll Back

Science reports that a new White House Office of Management and Budget memo rescinds previous ones that helped research institutions deal with pandemic-related closures.

Samples All Together

The Associated Press reports that US officials are considering allowing pooled COVID-19 testing.

In Genome Research this week: Y chromosome gene expression analysis, de novo mutations rise with paternal age in rhesus macaques, and more.

Even the Wild Horses

According to the News and Observer, a project aims to analyze the DNA of wild horses from North Carolina's Outer Banks.

More Needed

According to Nature News, the updated NIH sexual harassment policy does not address all of critics' concerns.

In PNAS this week: effect of premature termination codons in the DMD gene, knock-down of DUX4 in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, and more.

A genomic analysis indicates chickens were domesticated from red jungle fowl more than 9,000 years ago, Science reports.

Another Suit

According to Retraction Watch, Ohio State University's Carlo Croce is being sued by his former lawyers for payment.

Heart Disease Edits

The New York Times reports on an effort to use gene editing to treat high cholesterol and triglyceride levels in monkeys.

In PLOS this week: computational approach to gauge penetrance of risk variants, evolution of seasonal influenza A strains, and more.

Rick Bright, the former BARDA director, updates his whistleblower complaint to include allegations of ongoing retaliation, CBS News reports.

Extra Challenges

New Scientist reports on the institutional racism minority researchers encounter in the sciences.

Slow Change

NPR reports that the SARS-CoV-2 genome does not appear to accumulate mutations quickly, which should help vaccine efforts.

In Science this week: Fiber-seq method to examine regulatory architecture, mutations in SOST associated with osteoporosis drug-linked cardiovascular events, and more.

 

CNBC reports on some clinical trials' shift to being virtual in response to the pandemic.

Host Effects

Researchers continue to examine host genetic factors that may influence whether someone is at higher risk of more severe COVID-19, the Financial Times reports.

20 Years On

The Economist writes that the Human Genome Project has changed biology and medicine.

In Nature this week: population sequencing led to rare disease diagnoses, analysis of marine green alga leads to discovery of new phylum, and more.

For the Whole Town

A UK town is studying whether it can test its residents for COVID-19 each week, according to New Scientist.

In the Books

A new study finds that Black women are not represented in biology textbooks, BBC News reports.

Pages

The Washington Post reports on researchers' efforts to determine the effect of an increasingly common SARS-CoV-2 mutation.

Florida Politics reports Florida's law barring life, long-term care, and disability insurers from using genetic information in coverage decisions went into effect at the beginning of July.

A new analysis finds a link between popular media coverage of a scientific study and how often that paper is cited.

In Nature this week: CRISPR approaches to editing plant genomes, way to speed up DNA-PAINT, and more.