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The Scan

Free of Influence

Public health experts call for a transparent COVID-19 vaccine approval process in a letter; the Food and Drug Administration commissioner assures science-based approval.

The Verge reports that new gene-naming guidelines aim in part to avoid Excel-related name change confusion.

Overlooked Expertise

According to the Guardian, UK virologists say in a letter to officials that their expertise has been pushed aside in COVID-19 response plans.

In Nature this week: tuatara genome sequence aids in understanding amniote evolution, and more.

Novavax reports its candidate SARS-CoV-2 vaccine leads to immune responses, according to the Sydney Morning Herald.

The founder of MeTooSTEM, BethAnn McLaughlin, created a Twitter account purported to be that of an LGBTQ Native American professor at Arizona State University, the New York Times writes.

Gene length is associated with lifespan in a comparative genomics study appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that draws on the whale shark genome.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: effort to annotate the rat transcriptome, web-based resource to characterize marine microbes, and more.

The US National Institutes of Health is urging clinical trial sponsors to add in years of missing data, according to Stat News.

Into People's Arms

The Washington Post writes there are questions as to how a COVID-19 vaccine would be distributed in the US.

Pressure, Pressure

According to the New York Times, scientists are concerned about political pressure on the race for a COVID-19 vaccine.

In PNAS this week: Zika virus mutation linked to increased transmission, variants associated with inherited hearing loss, and more.

The UK is implementing COVID-19 testing with a 90-minute turnaround time.

Despite differences in their migration habits, eastern and western monarch butterflies are genetically similar, according to a study in Molecular Ecology.

The Chan Zuckerberg Biohub is working with California's health department to sequence viral samples from COVID-19 patients to trace viral introductions, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

In PLOS this week: identification of fungal species in subcutaneous infections, sequencing of Campylobacter found in raw meat from retail stores, and more.

Editing Squid

Researchers have used CRISPR-Cas9 to efficiently target a cephalopod pigmentation gene, as they report in Current Biology.

Minnesota police have used genetic genealogy to make an arrest in a 1986 cold case, reports NBC News.

From the Recovered

According to the Wall Street Journal, the Food and Drug Administration may soon issue an Emergency Use Authorization for convalescent plasma to treat COVID-19 patients.

In Science this week: chromatin accessibility of microglia during fetal development, and more.

A new analysis finds that Nobel Prizes are concentrated among a handful of sub-disciplines in the fields they cover.

Their Own Guinea Pigs

Technology Review reports some researchers are trying homemade SARS-CoV-2 vaccines on themselves.

According to NPR, there were irregularities in how the contract to collect COVID-19 data was awarded to TeleTracking Technologies.

In Nature this week: a suite of papers describing functional elements within the genome, and more.

Revived From the Deep

New Scientist reports that researchers have brought back microbes that may have been dormant under the ocean floor for millions of years.

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Public health experts call for a transparent COVID-19 vaccine approval process in a letter; the Food and Drug Administration commissioner assures science-based approval.

The Verge reports that new gene-naming guidelines aim in part to avoid Excel-related name change confusion.

In Nature this week: tuatara genome sequence aids in understanding amniote evolution, and more.

According to the Guardian, UK virologists say in a letter to officials that their expertise has been pushed aside in COVID-19 response plans.