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The Scan

NPR reports that some insect pests are now becoming resistant to Bt crops.

A 50-year-old cold case was cracked using genetic genealogy, the New York Times reports.

Not Convened

Science reports the US Food and Drug Administration did not consult an outside panel in its approval of remdesivir as a COVID-19 treatment.

In Nature this week: a framework for future human genomic research, PORE-cupine approach to study RNA structure using nanopore sequencing, and more.

Not Quite There Yet

According to CNBC, Pfizer has announced that its SARS-CoV-2 vaccine data won't be ready this week.

Call for Open Science

A number of United Nations agencies push for scientific findings to be made accessible through open science.

Paris-Saclay University garners international regard following a decade-long effort to establish the new research university, Nature News reports.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: database to house IndiGen sequencing data, database of SARS-CoV-2 docking scores, and more.

Verily Testing

Kaiser Health News reports San Francisco and Alameda counties in California are no longer using Verily Life Sciences' COVID-19 testing program, but a Verily spokesperson says it currently working with multiple Bay Area counties.

Decline in Antibodies

A UK study has found that antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 may decline over time, Reuters reports.

The New York Times reports that developers in New York City are increasingly interested in life science spaces.

In PNAS this week: genetic and epigenetic variation in individuals with diabetic kidney disease, spontaneous genetic alterations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and more.

And Resumed

Two coronavirus vaccine trials that had been paused in the US have resumed.

Nature survey finds a high level of support among scientists for former Vice President Joe Biden in the upcoming US election.

New License

The Scientist reports the physician behind Surgisphere inactivated his medical license in one state and received one in another.

In PLOS this week: analysis of link between somatic copy number and telomere length, sequencing study of individuals with gallbladder S. Typhi colonization, and more.

The New York Times reports that experts pushed during a meeting of an FDA advisory board for the agency to require more safety data from SARS-CoV-2 vaccine trials.

The UK and the European Union have come to a sticking point in the negotiation of how the UK might remain involved in the Horizon Europe research program, the Guardian reports.

The Washington Post reports Moderna expects that it will have enough data on its candidate SARS-CoV-2 vaccine to submit to regulatory authorities by mid-November.

In Science this week: ANXA11 variants affect calcium homeostasis and stress granule disassembly in ALS, and more.

To Get Back Going

The head of Operation Warp Speed tells Bloomberg he expects the paused AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson vaccine trials to resume soon.

A new UK government says socioeconomic factors, not genetics, account for disparities in deaths due to COVID-19 between ethnic groups, the Financial Times reports.

NPR reports on an Alzheimer's disease drug trial that is continuing despite the pandemic.

In Nature this week: CRISPR-Cas3 system for making large deletions efficiently, more.

The New York Times reports on how the US Food and Drug Administration has attempted to gird against pressure from the White House.

Pages

A 50-year-old cold case was cracked using genetic genealogy, the New York Times reports.

NPR reports that some insect pests are now becoming resistant to Bt crops.

Science reports the US Food and Drug Administration did not consult an outside panel in its approval of remdesivir as a COVID-19 treatment.

In Nature this week: a framework for future human genomic research, PORE-cupine approach to study RNA structure using nanopore sequencing, and more.