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The Scan

In PLOS this week: transcriptomic and genomic analysis of prostate cancer by ancestry, genes linked to liver function in Korean cohort, and more.

British Columbia is incorporating genomics into its tracking of the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, Business in Vancouver reports.

An analysis by the Personalized Medicine Coalition finds that about a quarter of new drugs approved in 2019 by the US Food and Drug Administration were personalized medicines.

Plan for Alzheimer's

The governor of New York has proposed a five-year plan to study the genomes of people with or who are at high risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

The New York City Police Department will be removing DNA profiles from a local database if they are from people who were never convicted of a crime, the New York Times reports.

Science reports that accusations of sexual assault against a microbiome researcher has also led to questions about his academic certifications.

Wired reports that researchers are analyzing the DNA fish leave behind in water to study their populations.

In Science this week: comprehensive cellular map of the human thymus, evidence of admixture between the ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovan and a 'superarchaic' population.

Cost of a Visa

The Guardian reports that visa costs could prevent scientists and others from coming to the UK.

May Have to Close

Nature News says some preprint repositories may close down due to a lack of funds to cover costs.

The Trump Administration is reconsidering its plan to issue an executive order to require federally funded research to be freely available upon publication, Times Higher Education reports.

In Nature this week: framework for analyzing cancer mutational signatures, treatment resistance in small cell lung cancer followed by increased intratumoral heterogeneity, and more.

At the Lancet, more than two dozen public health researchers condemn the conspiracy theories that have emerged surrounding the source of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Philip Leder Dies

The Washington Post reports that Philip Leder, who helped uncover how DNA codes for proteins and studied the role of genes in cancer, has died.

Researchers from Trinity College Dublin and the University of Pittsburgh look into how often de novo genes arise and how important they may be.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: pipeline for genotyping Alu retrotransposon mobile element insertions, previously undocumented non-coding RNAs, and more.

And Out

A genetic genealogy analysis helped secure the release of a California man from prison after getting his murder conviction overturned, the Guardian reports.

Phages With More

Researchers have uncovered large bacteriophages whose genomes include translational machinery, Live Science reports.

Quick Generation

Technology Review discusses the concerns that come along with the ability to quickly synthesize viruses like SARS-CoV-2.

In PNAS this week: role for Myc in alternative splicing regulation in prostate cancer, variation in methylation in Arabidopsis, and more.

Metabolite Trail

The Economist reports that it is increasingly easier to analyze the metabolites people give off, potentially revealing personal information about them.

Not Meeting Standards

The Los Angeles Times reports that only a third of California students meet the state's new science standards.

Just a Few Changes...

A controversial paper on the gender gap in science has been corrected, according to BuzzFeed News.

In Science this week: evidence of interbreeding between the ancestors of West Africans and an unknown archaic human, and more.

New Reagent Needed

Quality control checks uncover reagent flaw in some 2019-nCoV testing kits sent by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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In PLOS this week: transcriptomic and genomic analysis of prostate cancer by ancestry, genes linked to liver function in Korean cohort, and more.

British Columbia is incorporating genomics into its tracking of the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, Business in Vancouver reports.

An analysis by the Personalized Medicine Coalition finds that about a quarter of new drugs approved in 2019 by the US Food and Drug Administration were personalized medicines.

The governor of New York has proposed a five-year plan to study the genomes of people with or who are at high risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.