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The Scan

Relief Bill Signed

Politico reports President Donald Trump has signed the $2 trillion coronavirus relief package.

In a Different Lab

NPR reports that graduate students in the US are helping with SARS-CoV-2 testing.

Little Bit Improved

A new analysis finds that peer review improves the quality of preprints just a little bit, according to ScienceInsider.

In PLOS this week: epigenetic drug triggers anti-viral activity, viral diversity among individuals with HIV experiencing virological failure, and more.

Extension Call

Master's and doctoral students in the UK call on funding groups to extend their grants for the duration of the disruption caused by the COVID-19 outbreak, the Guardian reports.

For the Accelerator

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is putting $25 million toward COVID-19 treatment research, according to the Verge.

All Along the Axon

Squid can make edits to their RNA within the cytoplasm of their axons, Science News reports.

In Science this week: researchers engineer version of Cas9 that is nearly PAM-less, and more.

The US Senate has unanimously passed a $2 trillion stimulus package to address the coronavirus, the New York Times reports.

The White House earlier this week announced a supercomputer consortium to uncover or develop drugs to address the COVID-19 pandemic, according to NPR.

The Next Test

The Los Angeles Times writes that another coronavirus testing challenge — antibody testing — looms. 

In Nature this week: single-cell transcriptomic data to map human tissue, combined genomic and machine learning approach for non-invasive early lung cancer screening, and more.

More Funds

The Washington Post reports the US Senate is to vote on a $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus package today.

Still Following It

Bloomberg writes that Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center's Trevor Bedford and his colleagues continue to use viral genomics to track SARS-CoV-2.

The Smell Test

A woman's ability to smell differences between people with and without Parkinson's disease could someday lead to a tool to detect the condition early, according to NPR.

In Cell this week: analyses of SARS-CoV-2 interactions with human receptors and mouse pancreas cells that could form organoids.

The US Food and Drug Administration has issued a safety alert for fecal microbiota transplants as SARS-CoV-2 has been found in patients' stool.

Not Really From There

Mother Jones reports scammers are pretending to be from the CDC to sell COVID-19 tests.

Seeing the Tongue-ome

Researchers find through imaging that the tongue microbiome is highly structured, Science reports.

In PNAS this week: interactions of coronavirus' EndoU endoribonuclease enzyme, analysis of phylogenetic trees, and more.

From a Tweet

Nature News reports that some geneticists are concerned that they only learned from a colleague's tweet that they might have been exposed to SARS-CoV-2.

Following its Path

The UK is launching a research consortium to sequence SARS-CoV-2 samples from patients.

In PLOS this week: yeast modeling of mutations found through MSKCC IMPACT, tumor features associated with presence of circulating DNA, and more.

Funds To Get Through

ScienceInsider reports that academic groups in the US are pushing for additional research support to deal with disruptions brought on by the pandemic.

Seeking an Exemption

According to the Washington Post, an NIH researcher has been stymied in getting an exemption to use fetal tissue to study possible COVID-19 treatments.

Pages

NPR reports that graduate students in the US are helping with SARS-CoV-2 testing.

Politico reports President Donald Trump has signed the $2 trillion coronavirus relief package.

A new analysis finds that peer review improves the quality of preprints just a little bit, according to ScienceInsider.

In PLOS this week: epigenetic drug triggers anti-viral activity, viral diversity among individuals with HIV experiencing virological failure, and more.