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The Scan

The Next Batch

NPR reports that vaccine developers are working on SARS-CoV-2 vaccines that are easier to store or administer than the current crop.

Breathe It Out

Researchers are developing a breath test to determine how severe patients' methylmalonic acidemia disease is, FierceBiotech reports.

Switch for the Second

Reuters reports that France is to recommend that people under 55 who received one dose of AstraZeneca's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine receive a different vaccine for their second dose.

In Science this week: review discusses advances in liquid biopsies, and more.

A Response Here

The Los Angeles Times reports that current SARS-CoV-2 vaccines may be effective against the viral variant first identified in California.

CNN reports that the B.1.1.7 variant of SARS-CoV-2 is now the most common one circulating in the US.

Which Steps to Take

The New York Times writes that both the World Health Organization team and its critics have suggested additional studies to pursue into the origins of SARS-CoV-2.

In Nature this week: enhancer-gene maps of 131 human cell types and tissues, use of nanopore sequencing to uncover DNA methylation in bacteria, and more.

Repeated Issues

The New York Times reports on repeated problems at Emergent BioSolutions' vaccine manufacturing facility.

The Wall Street Journal reports that some researchers are turning synthetic patient data in their work.

The president of Massachusetts General Hospital is stepping down, the Boston Globe reports.

In Genome Research this week: more than a dozen AML epitypes described, antisense RNA in vertebrate development, and more.

Testing Twice a Week

According to NPR, England is to begin offering free rapid COVID-19 testing, though critics worry about false positives.

Technology Review writes that some benefits of viral genomic surveillance may be difficult to garner in the US.

CNN reports the B.1.1.7 SARS-CoV-2 variant has been reported throughout the US, underscoring the race between viral variants and vaccination.

In PNAS this week: homozygous variants linked to mycobacterial disease susceptibility, analysis of the giant axolotl genome, and more.

Funding Pinch

The COVID-19 pandemic has hampered the ability of UK medical charities to raise research funds, the Guardian says.

Robert Baldwin Dies

Robert Baldwin, who was known as Buzz and studied the three-dimensional folding of proteins, has died at 93, The Scientist reports.

The Sacramento Bee reports the University of California was recently affected by a cybersecurity attack.

In PLOS this week: DNA methylation patterns in breast cancer, multi-omic analysis of samples from COVID-19 patients, and more.

To Cover the Fees

The UK government announced it would provide an extra £250 million in science and research funding to cover the cost of participation in the Horizon Europe program, the Guardian reports.

Cleaning It Out

The Philippine Daily Inquirer says contamination has been found among sequencing machines being used by the Philippine Genome Center to analyze SARS-CoV-2 genomes.

Buzzfeed News reports some researchers are boycotting the Journal of the American Medical Association following its podcast episode skeptical of structural racism in medicine.

In Science this week: blood transcriptome analysis of type 1 diabetes, and more.

The US National Institutes of Health and Moderna are enrolling volunteers in a clinical trial evaluating a candidate vaccine aimed at the B.1.351 SARS-CoV-2 variant.

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Researchers are developing a breath test to determine how severe patients' methylmalonic acidemia disease is, FierceBiotech reports.

NPR reports that vaccine developers are working on SARS-CoV-2 vaccines that are easier to store or administer than the current crop.

Reuters reports that France is to recommend that people under 55 who received one dose of AstraZeneca's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine receive a different vaccine for their second dose.