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The Scan

The Los Angeles Times reports on concerns regarding rapid DNA analysis by law enforcement.

Wildlife forensic investigators are using DNA sequencing and other forensic tools to address wildlife crime, according to BBC Future.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: database of genotype-phenotype associations in eukaryotes, DNA curtains to visualize how Bloom helicase works, and more.

Not These Sequences

Easier DNA synthesis means it might be easier for people to gain access to sequences from pathogens they should not have, NPR reports.

Retraction Watch reports on the latest goings-on with  Carlo Croce's lawsuit against Ohio State University.

Waiting a While

The Irish Cancer Society highlight the lack of funding for genetic testing services, the Independent reports.

In PNAS this week: cell division rates decline with age, different genetic lineages of chytrid fungus found, and more.

Points to Oxytocin

Researchers have uncovered methylation differences linked to altered oxytocin signaling among people with hypersexual disorder, New Scientist reports.

Canadian food inspectors are relying on whole-genome sequencing to track foodborne pathogens, the CBC reports.

In PLOS this week: genetic diversity of invasive Echium plantagineum, gene-miRNA interactions in abdominal aortic aneurysm, and more.

Dunno Whose It Is

According to Wired, Nebula Genomics is providing a way for people to get their genomes sequenced anonymously.

Keep Them or Not?

NPR says the explosion and fire earlier this week at a Russian lab that stores dangerous pathogens revives the question of whether such samples should be kept.

A 26-year-old woman tells Cosmopolitan about learning her APOE status at a young age.

In Science journals this week: a functional genomic screen uncovers drug combination that increases KRAS inhibitor efficacy in aggressive lung cancer, and more.

Making a Mark

A new analysis finds that nearly half the late-stage clinical trials sponsored by a US National Cancer Institute program influence patient care.

And Maybe a Fee

The owner of the GEDmatch website tells CBS12 he is considering charging law enforcement a fee to use the site.

Technology Review reports that sickle cell patients are optimistic about gene editing to treat their disease, but are worried about how available it will be.

In Nature this week: babies born by caesarean section are more likely to have altered gut microbiota profiles, and more.

A new paper says an effort to introduce gene drives into mosquitos altered the genetic makeup of the local mosquitos, but the company behind the project says the paper is flawed.

Wheat Over Time

Researchers examine changes in the genomes of emmer wheat populations where the climate has warmed, the BBC reports.

DNA for Attorneys

Virginia's Department of Forensic Science is offering attorneys a course on DNA testing, the Virginian-Pilot reports.

In Cell this week: microinjection of CRISPR-Cas9 enables targeted mutations in Anolis, melanoma proteomic profiling, and more.

A gas explosion sparked a fire at a Russian laboratory that stores dangerous pathogens, the Guardian reports.

Ways to Make the Move

A new report offers ways for small, society publishers to transition to Plan S standards, ScienceInsider says.

Researchers turn to protein analysis to examine an ancient rhino sample, Smithsonian.com reports.

Pages

GenomeWeb reports that Veritas Genetics is suspending its US operations.

A Brazilian-led team of researchers reports it has generated a sugarcane genome assembly that encompasses more than 99 percent of its genome.

Certain plasma proteins could be used to gauge a person's age and whether they are aging well, according to HealthDay News.

In Science this week: approach to measure microRNA targeting efficiency, strategy to conduct high-throughput chemical screens at single-cell resolution, and more.