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The Scan

Not Up to the Promise

The Hastings Center's Erik Parens argues in a Scientific American opinion piece that the current pandemic underscores the need to reconsider the hope placed in genomic medicine. 

The Sydney Morning Herald reports that Australia is launching its trial of preconception carrier testing Tuesday.

Quick!

The Los Angeles Times writes that Operation Warp Speed has an ambitious timeline for developing a COVID-19 vaccine.

In PNAS this week: autosomal genes commonly affected by loss-of-function variants, variants implicated in testis development disorders, and more.

President Donald Trump announced the US would be leaving the World Health Organization, NBC News reports.

Limited Early Spread

CDC head says a new analysis indicates earlier testing wouldn't have caught viral spread, NPR reports.

A study of Great Danes homes in on a genomic region linked to fearfulness.

In PLOS this week: gene expression and epigenetics of Indonesian populations, hookworm parasite secretome, and more.

Rady's Children Hospital and San Diego County are teaming up to test pediatric patients and their families for COVID-19 to gauge the spread of the virus locally, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune.

Nature News reports that genomics is being applied to trace and try to prevent additional COVID-19 waves.

Wildlife managers aim to boost the genetic diversity of Mexican gray wolves by placing captive-born foster pups into packs with similarly aged wild pups, the Mercury News reports.

In Science this week: Genetic Probability tool identifies likely diagnoses in 45 percent of inflammatory arthritis cases, and more.

Maybe Not the Source

The first reported coronavirus cases in Europe and the US might not be related to the subsequent outbreaks in those areas, according to the New York Times.

Not Making It Clearer

The Wall Street Journal and Kaiser Health News report that antibody testing for SARS-CoV-2 has led to further confusion.

And Now Machines

According to NPR, there's a growing shortage of machines to run SARS-CoV-2 tests.

In Nature this week: the largest known collection of human genetic variants, and more.

A New NSF?

A new bill would reshape the US National Science Foundation to include a focus on technological development, according to Science.

A tissue sample from the 1960s harbors a near-complete sample of HIV, IFLScience reports.

Stopped It

The Food and Drug Administration's decision to halt a SARS-CoV-2 study has drawn criticism, according to Stat News.

In Genome Biology this week: features affecting gut microbiome and parasite patterns, cellular interactions in lung tumor microenvironment, and more.

ApoE and COVID-19

A study suggests people with the ApoE e4 genotype may be more likely to have severe COVID-19 than those with other genotypes, the Guardian says.

New analyses indicate female researchers are publishing less during the coronavirus pandemic than male researchers, according to Nature News.

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies are searching for a genetic reason for why some people, but not others, become gravely ill with COVID-19, the Detroit Free Press reports.

In PNAS this week: forward genetics-base analysis of retinal development, interactions of T cell receptors with neoantigens in colorectal cancer, and more.

Nobel laureates and scientific societies urge NIH and the Department of Health and Human Services to revisit the recent decision to end funding for a coronavirus grant.

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The Hastings Center's Erik Parens argues in a Scientific American opinion piece that the current pandemic underscores the need to reconsider the hope placed in genomic medicine. 

The Los Angeles Times writes that Operation Warp Speed has an ambitious timeline for developing a COVID-19 vaccine.

The Sydney Morning Herald reports that Australia is launching its trial of preconception carrier testing Tuesday.

In PNAS this week: autosomal genes commonly affected by loss-of-function variants, variants implicated in testis development disorders, and more.