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The Scan

According to ScienceInsider, the US National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine is planning a study of racism in academic research.

Up to Him

The Washington Post writes that the approval in the US of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine will be up to Peter Marks, a career official at the Food and Drug Administration.

Kodak Loan on Pause

NPR reports the US loan to Eastman Kodak to boost domestic pharmaceutical production is on pause following insider trading allegations.

In Cell this week: blood immune cell changes in COVID-19 patients and spatial transcriptomics in Alzheimer's disease.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Russia's announcement of a coronavirus vaccine approval was met with concern as safety testing has not yet been completed.

Numbers Needed

New Scientist writes there aren't much data available on the accuracy of the two rapid COVID-19 tests the UK plans to roll out.

In PNAS this week: downstream effect of oncoprotein fusion, epigenetic changes influence tRNAs in colon cancer, and more.

Noel Rose Dies

Noel Rose, the "father of autoimmunity," has died at 92, the Washington Post reports.

Nature News reports that recent proposed changes to the US National Science Foundation have raised concerns about a shift away from the agency's focus on basic research.

Flush the System

According to CNN, Legionella was discovered in buildings leased by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as they reopened following coronavirus pandemic-related closures.

In PLOS this week: genetic analysis of malaria parasite populations in Southeast Asia, genomic surveillance of yellow fever virus in São Paulo, and more.

US Agricultural Research Service scientists have sequenced the genome of the Asian giant hornet.

A study of families explores how children transmit SARS-CoV-2, according to the Associated Press.

In a Pool Together

According to the Economist, pooled testing for COVID-19 could help alleviate strains on testing labs.

In Science this week: MIT researchers outline approach dubbed translatable components regression to predict treatment response among IBD patients.

Free of Influence

Public health experts call for a transparent COVID-19 vaccine approval process in a letter; the Food and Drug Administration commissioner assures science-based approval.

The Verge reports that new gene-naming guidelines aim in part to avoid Excel-related name change confusion.

Overlooked Expertise

According to the Guardian, UK virologists say in a letter to officials that their expertise has been pushed aside in COVID-19 response plans.

In Nature this week: tuatara genome sequence aids in understanding amniote evolution, and more.

Novavax reports its candidate SARS-CoV-2 vaccine leads to immune responses, according to the Sydney Morning Herald.

The founder of MeTooSTEM, BethAnn McLaughlin, created a Twitter account purported to be that of an LGBTQ Native American professor at Arizona State University, the New York Times writes.

Gene length is associated with lifespan in a comparative genomics study appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that draws on the whale shark genome.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: effort to annotate the rat transcriptome, web-based resource to characterize marine microbes, and more.

The US National Institutes of Health is urging clinical trial sponsors to add in years of missing data, according to Stat News.

Into People's Arms

The Washington Post writes there are questions as to how a COVID-19 vaccine would be distributed in the US.

Pages

According to ScienceInsider, the US National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine is planning a study of racism in academic research.

The Washington Post writes that the approval in the US of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine will be up to Peter Marks, a career official at the Food and Drug Administration.

NPR reports the US loan to Eastman Kodak to boost domestic pharmaceutical production is on pause following insider trading allegations.

In Cell this week: blood immune cell changes in COVID-19 patients and spatial transcriptomics in Alzheimer's disease.