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The Scan

New analyses indicate the P.1 variant found in Brazil may be able to infect people who have already had COVID-19, the New York Times reports.

The US National Institutes of Health has a new initiative to address structural racism in biomedical research.

Aiming for May

According to CNBC, Novavax's CEO says its vaccine could be authorized in the US as early as May.

In PNAS this week: GWAS of TLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, analysis of twins with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and more.

And a Third

The New York Times reports that the US Food and Drug Administration has authorized Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

More Details Wanted

Nature News writes that additional details about the UK plan for an agency to support high-risk, high-reward science are needed.

The Wall Street Journal writes new studies are giving glimpses into the origins of SARS-CoV-2.

In PLOS this week: analysis of Plasmodium population structure, qPCR assay to diagnose scabies, and more.

Forbes reports that a structural biology lab at Oxford University studying the coronavirus was hacked.

Even Bigger

Politico reports that the NYPD DNA database has grown since it announced it would be removing profiles from it.

Not Going to Pay

Science reports that a Dutch research funding agency is combating a ransomware attack.

In Science this week: set of 64 haplotype assemblies from 32 individuals, and more.

To Keep Up

SARS-CoV-2 vaccine developers are evaluating further vaccine doses as well as modified doses to keep up with new viral variants, according to CNN.

The New York Times reports that a new viral variant of concern has been identified in New York City.

In Nature this week: spatiotemporally resolved map of the human cell cycle, folding single-cell RNA sequencing into cancer drug studies, and more.

Support for Another

CNN reports that a US Food and Drug Administration document says Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine meets the requirements to receive an Emergency Use Authorization.

According to BBC News, the global vaccine-sharing initiative has sent its first shipment, which arrived in Ghana this week.

New Prototype Test

Researchers in France are developing a new, fast test for SARS-CoV-2 that initial testing indicates may be highly accurate, the Guardian says.

In Cell this week: analysis of fitness patterns among SARS-CoV-2 isolates, single-cell transcriptome analysis of immune features in COVID-19, and more.

Bloomberg reports that vaccine developers won't have to conduct large trials of updated vaccines or vaccine boosters aimed at new viral variants.

The SARS-CoV-2 variant uncovered in California may be more transmissible and partially evade vaccine-induced antibody response, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Francis deSouza, the CEO of Illumina, calls for a global SARS-CoV-2 genomics surveillance network, according to the Financial Times.

In PNAS this week: immunotherapy for hard-to-treat breast cancers, effects of oncogenic histone H3K36M mutations, and more.

The New York Times writes that the unfilled top spot at the US Food and Drug Administration is "glaring."

Boost to Surveillance

The Canadian COVID-19 Genomics Network aims to increase its genomic surveillance of emerging SARS-CoV-2 strains, the Canadian Press reports.

Pages

New analyses indicate the P.1 variant found in Brazil may be able to infect people who have already had COVID-19, the New York Times reports.

According to CNBC, Novavax's CEO says its vaccine could be authorized in the US as early as May.

The US National Institutes of Health has a new initiative to address structural racism in biomedical research.

In PNAS this week: GWAS of TLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, analysis of twins with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and more.