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The Scan

In a letter, about two dozen researchers criticize the World Health Organization investigation into the origins of SARS-CoV-2 and call for a new inquiry, the Wall Street Journal reports.

National Geographic reports that nine great apes at the San Diego Zoo have been vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2.

Janet Woodcock, the acting commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, speaks with NPR about SARS-CoV-2 testing and vaccines in the US.

In Science this week: genetic study of kidney fibrosis implicates the SOX9-NAV3-YAP1 axis.

European regulators have begun a rolling review of Russia's Sputnik V SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, Reuters reports.

Science reports that Science Foundation Ireland is seeking annual budget increases.

Lower Fees Sought

According to the Financial Times, a UK university group is pushing Elsevier to lower its journal fees.

In Nature this week: satellite tracking and genome sequencing combination used to examine migration patterns of peregrine falcons, and more.

A survey by Nature finds that most researchers want scientific meetings to continue virtually or with a virtual component, even after the pandemic ends.

Certain blood proteins may be able to distinguish COVID-19 patients who will become critically ill from those who will not, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

For Cross-Protection

Bloomberg reports that the B.1.351 SARS-CoV-2 viral variant could prompt the formulation of better vaccines.

In Genome Biology this week: algorithm to assess regulatory features, approach to integrate multiple single-cell RNA-seq datasets, and more.

New analyses indicate the P.1 variant found in Brazil may be able to infect people who have already had COVID-19, the New York Times reports.

The US National Institutes of Health has a new initiative to address structural racism in biomedical research.

Aiming for May

According to CNBC, Novavax's CEO says its vaccine could be authorized in the US as early as May.

In PNAS this week: GWAS of TLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, analysis of twins with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and more.

And a Third

The New York Times reports that the US Food and Drug Administration has authorized Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

More Details Wanted

Nature News writes that additional details about the UK plan for an agency to support high-risk, high-reward science are needed.

The Wall Street Journal writes new studies are giving glimpses into the origins of SARS-CoV-2.

In PLOS this week: analysis of Plasmodium population structure, qPCR assay to diagnose scabies, and more.

Forbes reports that a structural biology lab at Oxford University studying the coronavirus was hacked.

Even Bigger

Politico reports that the NYPD DNA database has grown since it announced it would be removing profiles from it.

Not Going to Pay

Science reports that a Dutch research funding agency is combating a ransomware attack.

In Science this week: set of 64 haplotype assemblies from 32 individuals, and more.

To Keep Up

SARS-CoV-2 vaccine developers are evaluating further vaccine doses as well as modified doses to keep up with new viral variants, according to CNN.

Pages

In a letter, about two dozen researchers criticize the World Health Organization investigation into the origins of SARS-CoV-2 and call for a new inquiry, the Wall Street Journal reports.

National Geographic reports that nine great apes at the San Diego Zoo have been vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2.

Janet Woodcock, the acting commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, speaks with NPR about SARS-CoV-2 testing and vaccines in the US.

In Science this week: genetic study of kidney fibrosis implicates the SOX9-NAV3-YAP1 axis.