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The Scan

The Washington Post reports that a Russian Academy of Sciences commission has led to the retraction of hundreds of scientific papers.

News 4 Jax reports that a Florida bill to prevent life and long-term care insurers from using genetic information in their coverage decisions has easily passed one committee.

The Los Angeles Times' Daily Pilot reports the chief executive of Vantari Genetics has pleaded guilty in a kickback scheme.

In Science this week: potentially pathogenic mutations found in hematopoietic stem cells from young healthy donors, and more.

If They Don't Know...

Bloomberg Law writes that the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act may work better as a privacy, rather than anti-discrimination, law.

A new report finds that though the US has increased its activity in science and engineering, its global share of that activity has fallen in some areas, according to Inside Higher Ed.

New Startup from Avey

TechCrunch reports that Linda Avey has a new personal genomics startup that's focusing on India.

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of rapeseed, universal target enrichment method for metagenomic sequencing, and more.

Stress and Bullying

A survey commissioned by the Wellcome Trust finds high levels of bullying and harassment in research, the Guardian reports.

Creeping Changes

The Verge writes that the plan to collect migrants' DNA and add it to an FBI database will change the tenor of that database.

Nature News reports that cloning researcher Li Ning has been sentenced to 12 years in jail for embezzling research funds.

In Genome Research this week: transcriptomic study of human brain development, metabolomic analysis of fruit flies, and more.

So, What'd You Find?

An analysis by Science finds that many institutes have not uploaded results to ClinicalTrials.gov within the one-year deadline.

Call to Share

The Wall Street Journal reports that the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics has called on Myriad Genetics and others to share the genetic data they have amassed.

And Prize

Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier are being awarded Israel's Wolf Prize in medicine for their CRISPR work, the Associated Press reports.

In PNAS this week: population genomics study on indigenous individuals in Brazil, programmable genome-editing approach, and more.

Now, Developer

Bloomberg reports that 23andMe has licensed an antibody it developed to treat inflammatory diseases to a Spanish drugmaker.

Lot to Handle

In an editorial, the New York Times examines issues the new US Food and Drug Administration commissioner is to face.

The UK's chief scientific advisor calls for more scientists to be part of the British civil service, the Guardian says.

In PLOS this week: role for TWIST1 gene expression in vascular disease risk, new Campylobacter species, and more.

A Florida lawmaker is introducing a bill to prevent life and long-term care insurance companies from using genetic data in coverage decisions, the Orlando Sentinel reports.

University of California, Davis researchers describe ways that genetic genealogy databases could be "hacked."

Data Gathering

PBS NewsHour reports on efforts to sequence more people to fuel personalized medicine.

In Science this week: inefficiencies in negotiating data-use agreements can delay research, and more. 

Sequencing analysis has tied a new coronavirus to the pneumonia outbreak occurring in China, Vox reports.

Pages

The Washington Post reports that a Russian Academy of Sciences commission has led to the retraction of hundreds of scientific papers.

The Los Angeles Times' Daily Pilot reports the chief executive of Vantari Genetics has pleaded guilty in a kickback scheme.

News 4 Jax reports that a Florida bill to prevent life and long-term care insurers from using genetic information in their coverage decisions has easily passed one committee.

In Science this week: potentially pathogenic mutations found in hematopoietic stem cells from young healthy donors, and more.