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Spartan Bioscience: Roger Eacock, Others

Spartan Bioscience, a Canadian company specializing in portable molecular diagnostic testing, has announced several new executive and board appointments. Roger Eacock joins the company as its new CEO and board member. Eacock has previously held leadership roles with companies such as TerrAscend, Sobeys, SunOpta, and Dell.

Eacock's appointment follows the election of three new members to Spartan's board of directors. Board Chair Rochelle Stenzler is a pharmacist with extensive experience as a senior executive in healthcare, retailing, consumer packaged goods, and interactive voice response technology. She has previously served as president of Revlon Canada and president and general manager of Pharma Plus Drugmarts.

Board member Arun Menawat is CEO of Profound Medical, which is developing a real-time MRI-guided thermal ultrasound system for incision-free ablation of abnormal or cancerous tissue. He is also former president and CEO of Novadaq Technologies.

Board member Maryscott Greenwood is partner and managing director of Crestview Strategy US, a public affairs consultancy. She is also CEO of the Canadian American Business Council.

Additionally, Lennie Ryer joins Spartan as CFO with more than 20 years of experience as CFO of several biotechnology companies including SQI Diagnostics and ConjuChem; and Trevor Brown joins Spartan as chief commercial officer, having previously served as vice president of precision medicine for Seracare Lifesciences and director of global strategic marketing at Luminex Molecular Diagnostics.

Finally, Jennifer Ross-Carriere has joined Spartan as chief legal and administrative officer. Ross-Carriere most recently served as general counsel, corporate secretary, and vice president, people and culture at IFS (previously Mxi Technologies).

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