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Nobel Prize: Emmanuelle Charpentier, Jennifer Doudna

Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna have been jointly awarded the 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry for their discovery and development of the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing method.

"There is enormous power in this genetic tool, which affects us all. It has not only revolutionized basic science, but also resulted in innovative crops and will lead to ground-breaking new medical treatments," said Nobel Committee for Chemistry Chair Claes Gustafsson in a statement.

Charpentier is the director of the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Berlin. She holds a PhD from the Institute Pasteur in France.

Doudna is a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. She holds a PhD from Harvard Medical School.

The two Nobel laureates will equally share the 10 million Swedish kronor ($1.12 million) award.

The Scan

NFTs for Genome Sharing

Nature News writes that non-fungible tokens could be a way for people to profit from sharing genomic data.

Wastewater Warning System

Time magazine writes that cities and college campuses are monitoring sewage for SARS-CoV-2, an approach officials hope lasts beyond COVID-19.

Networks to Boost Surveillance

Scientific American writes that new organizations and networks aim to improve the ability of developing countries to conduct SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance.

Genome Biology Papers on Gastric Cancer Epimutations, BUTTERFLY, GUNC Tool

In Genome Biology this week: recurrent epigenetic mutations in gastric cancer, correction tool for unique molecular identifier-based assays, and more.