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Emily Balskus, Ami Bhatt, Dean Lee, Jeffrey Rathmell, Noopur Raje, Cameron Turtle

Caribou Biosciences has appointed Emily Balskus, Ami Bhatt, Dean Lee, Jeffrey Rathmell, Noopur Raje, and Cameron Turtle to its scientific advisory board. 

Balskus is a professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Harvard University and an associate member of the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. Bhatt is an assistant professor of medicine (hematology) and genetics at Stanford University. Lee is a professor of pediatrics at Nationwide Children's Hospital and Ohio State University, and is also the founding director of the joint cellular therapy and cancer immunotherapy program between the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital and Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center. Rathmell serves as director of the Vanderbilt Center for Immunobiology and as associate director of the Institute of Infection, Immunology and Inflammation at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Raje is a professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, director of the Center for Multiple Myeloma, and the Rita Kelley Chair in Oncology at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. And Turtle is an associate member at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and an associate professor at the University of Washington.

The new members will join current scientific advisory board members and Caribou cofounders Jennifer Doudna and Martin Jinek.

The Scan

Interfering With Invasive Mussels

The Chicago Tribune reports that researchers are studying whether RNA interference- or CRISPR-based approaches can combat invasive freshwater mussels.

Participation Analysis

A new study finds that women tend to participate less at scientific meetings but that some changes can lead to increased involvement, the Guardian reports.

Right Whales' Decline

A research study plans to use genetic analysis to gain insight into population decline among North American right whales, according to CBC.

Science Papers Tie Rare Mutations to Short Stature, Immunodeficiency; Present Single-Cell Transcriptomics Map

In Science this week: pair of mutations in one gene uncovered in brothers with short stature and immunodeficiency, and more.