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Thermo Fisher's Precision ID NGS System for Forensic Analysis

Thermo Fisher Scientific has launched its Precision ID next-generation sequencing system. The system comprises five distinct Precision ID panels to suit the varying needs of forensic casework: The Precision ID GlobalFiler NGS STR panel, which analyzes a total of 33 targets, including the expanded CODIS loci; the Precision ID mtDNA Whole Genome panel, which uses an innovative small-target approach to obtain optimal results from highly compromised and degraded samples, such as hair shafts, teeth, and bones; the Precision ID mtDNA Control Region panel, which is similar to the Whole Genome panel but targets the 1.2kb control region and covers HV-I, II, and III; the Precision ID Identity Panel, which is composed of 124 SNP markers, providing discrimination of individuals similar to STR genotype match probabilities used by forensic analysts; and the Precision ID Ancestry Panel, which is composed of 165 SNP markers that provide biogeographic ancestry information to guide the investigation process.

Each panel is designed to work with the Ion Chef System for automated library and template preparation and the Ion S5 and Ion S5 XL systems, and the two chip formats also enable multiple panels to be sequenced in a single run, the company said.

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