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Qiagen GeneRead QiaAct Panels and QiaSeq TMB Panel

Qiagen has launched two new GeneRead QiaAct panels for use on its GeneReader NGS System, as well as a new QiaSeq panel for use on any next-generation sequencing system to measure tumor mutational burden.

The GeneRead QiaAct Actionable Insights Tumor DNA UMI panel broadens coverage from 12 to 30 genes influencing development and progression of the most widespread cancers, including lung, melanoma, prostate and other solid tumors. The workflow targets more than 850 DNA variants in hotspot regions as well as 125 full exons.

The GeneRead QiaAct BRCA Advanced UMI panel enables analysis of the full exon coding sequences of the BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and PTEN genes, which play key roles in the development and progression of breast, ovarian and other cancers. The workflow will enable alignment with National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines on the need for comprehensive testing that encompasses full BRCA1/2 sequencing and detection of large gene rearrangements, Qiagen said.

The QiaSeq TMB Panel is designed to run on any commercial NGS platform, and the workflow targets variants in 486 genes covering full exons. In a single panel, QiaSeq TMB detects tumor mutational burden, microsatellite instability, single nucleotide variants, and indels.

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