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Desktop Genetics DESKGEN Series CRISPR Libraries

Desktop Genetics launched its DESKGEN Series CRISPR Libraries to support gene editing efforts in academic and biopharma settings. The series consists of six new CRISPR library products, each of which can be tailored to an investigator's list of genomic targets using any delivery method. Each product addresses a particular experimental application of the genome editing technology, the company said. Disrupt Libraries can be used to functionally knock out genes to reveal novel druggable targets and essential pathways; Tile Libraries saturate coding and non-coding regions to reveal genotype-phenotype relationships; SNP-In Libraries allow high-throughput insertion and deletion knockins across the genome; Interfere Libraries silence target gene expression with CRISPRi; Activate Libraries allow over-expression of target genes with CRISPRa; and Predict Libraries provide a unique scoring algorithm optimized for teams working on specific model cell lines or organisms, enabling other libraries to be designed more effectively.

Once the company receives a customer's list of targets, it designs the library using its proprietary DESKGEN AI and suite of bioinformatics pipelines. Once the designs are complete, the company manufactures the library in a variety of ready-to-use formats including plasmids, RNA, ribonucleoproteins, or as lentivirus, in either pooled or arrayed format.

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