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Cellecta CloneTracker XP Expressed Lentiviral Barcode Library and Barcoded CRISPR Library

Cellecta has launched the CloneTracker XP Expressed Lentiviral Barcode Library and CloneTracker XP Barcoded CRISPR Library product lines. The new CloneTracker XP Barcode Libraries differ from Cellecta's standard CloneTracker Barcode Library in that the unique DNA sequence is designed to express on an RNA transcript in the cells. The libraries can therefore be detected by either DNA or RNA sequencing. Researchers can use these libraries to label several million cells each with a unique barcode, subsequently performing NGS to sort out sub-populations of progeny cells derived from the original progenitors at any point during the experiment.

Additionally, a variation of the new CloneTracker XP barcode labeling product introduces a gene effector, in this case CRISPR sgRNA, into the barcode library. Each effector targets and disrupts a specific gene in each of the cells that pick up a barcode. In combination with cell-specific barcode tracking, this knockout helps researchers see how specific genetic disruptions change the cells' characteristics while simultaneously identifying the genetic pathways that are activated to produce them. The firm offers two small, pre-made CloneTracker XP Barcoded CRISPR knockout libraries targeting 27 human and mouse anti-cancer genes, as well as custom library development services for CloneTracker XP Barcoded CRISPR Libraries. The CloneTracker XP Expressed Barcode Libraries are available with barcodes expressed in the 3′- or 5′-UTR of an RNA transcript, and with fluorescent or chemiluminescent reporters.

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