Technical Editor III

Organization
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center & Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Job Location
Seattle, WA
Job Description

This position will assist with the planning, writing, editing, and production of a variety of highly specialized scientific and technical documentation and materials for publication. Deliverables include journals articles, manuscripts, technical manuals, grant applications, posters, presentations, etc., while ensuring that all materials meet established standards of appearance and content. The writing is in the area of statistical and laboratory science of clinical trials for vaccine and infectious disease research, within the Biostatistics, Bioinformatics and Epidemiology Program, which includes The Statistical Center for HIV/AIDS Research and Prevention (SCHARP). The research centers on studies conducted by the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) and the Vaccine Immunology Statistical Center of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation's Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery. This position reports to the P.I. of the Statistical Data Management Center for the HVTN.

SCOPE OF RESPONSIBILITIES
Works under limited supervision. Uses discretion within existing guidelines and standards; final review/authorization of materials is made by supervisor and/or scientific staff.

JOB DUTIES
- Prepare outlines of scientific manuscripts including writing of materials and methods sections, and preparing tables and graphs in coordination with the scientific staff doing the studies. Prepare the manuscripts according to the style guides of the submitting journal. Submit and follow the manuscript through publication.
- Coordinate and edit revisions to book chapters, manuscripts, articles, reports and teaching materials of a highly technical nature.
- Coordinate documentation preparation with publication deadlines, grant deadlines, collaboration efforts and other projects.
- Recommend edits on written materials to improve readability, coherence, accuracy, grammar, and conformity to internal and publishing standards of style.
- Copyedit and proofread scientific manuscripts, and coordinate journal submission.
- Review professional journals and books to stay abreast of new requirements in technical writing field.
- Produce figures and/or graphics for publications.
- Provide other technical and administrative support as needed.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
- Requires bachelor's degree in English or scientific field directly related to department/program
- Ability to handle multiple projects at one time
- Ability to work with collaboratively with subject matter experts; enjoys working as a team member as well as independently
- Experience in publishing and editing, strong editing and writing skills, and excellent communication skills with attention to detail.
- Expertise in Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Endnote, Reference Manager, and Adobe software required. Experience with bibliographic software including BibTeX, as well as familiarity with scientific research methods, preferred but not required. Experience with LaTeX also preferred.
- Minimum of one year analytical and writing experience in a health care, research, or academic environment setting. Experience with grant preparation highly desirable.
- Knowledge of medical terminology.
- Desired: Master's degree in Science (Immunology, Biochemistry, Biology, etc) or English (with extensive science background) or certification from the American Medical Writers Association or an Editor in the Life Sciences (ELS), awarded by the Board of Editors in the Life Sciences (bels.org).

We are a VEVRAA Federal Contractor

If interested, please apply online at http://track.tmpservice.com/ApplyClick.aspx?id=2217613-2647-5721

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