Sr. Scientist Oligonucleotide Process Development | GenomeWeb

Sr. Scientist Oligonucleotide Process Development

Organization
Cepheid - US
Job Location
Bothell, WA 98021
Job Description

The Senior Scientist – Oligonucleotide Process Development will develop safe and cost-efficient processes for the production of oligonucleotides in an FDA-QSR and ISO9001 compliant organization. The ideal candidate will have expertise in oligonucleotide synthesis process development, writing process documentation and transferring the processes into manufacturing.

Responsibilities:
• Develop and improve processes for efficient automated synthesis of oligonucleotides for PCR applications.
• Develop and improve procedures for large-scale synthesis and purification of oligonucleotides.
• Serve internal customers with a research grade oligonucleotides: accept orders, synthesize, purify, provide COA, ship, plan and keep track.
• Run MerMade and AKTA synthesizers, maintain and troubleshoot.
• Use analytical instruments: HPLC, UHPLC, LC-MS, UV-Vis, fluorescent and other methods for compounds characterization.
• Keep good laboratory records, document process protocols, create SOPs and worksheets for manufacturing.
• Develop procedures for the process transfer to manufacturing.

  • Ph.D. in Chemistry/Engineering/Life Sciences or other job-related discipline.
  • A minimum of 10 years of industrial experience in oligonucleotide synthesis or development of reagents for automated oligonucleotide synthesis (modified bases, linkers, dyes).
  • Knowledge of HPLC, LC-MS, UV-Vis, fluorescent and other analytical instruments.
  • Extensive knowledge of laboratory automation.
  • Excellent writing, communication and organizational skills.
  • Writing process transfer documentation for chemical processes.

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How to Apply

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