Sr. Biochemical Automation Workflow Engineer

Organization
Agilent Technologies, Inc. US
Job Location
Santa Clara, CA
Job Description

 

Agilent inspires and supports discoveries that advance the quality of life. We provide life science, diagnostic and applied market laboratories worldwide with instruments, services, consumables, applications and expertise. Agilent enables customers to gain the answers and insights they seek -- so they can do what they do best: improve the world around us. 
Agilent is committed to being the premier laboratory partner providing powerful yet easy-to-use LC/MS workflow solutions to our customers. The successful candidate will leverage extensive process development knowledge and experience to migrate manual sample preparation assays onto the AssayMAP and Bravo platforms to enhance workflow data quality and increase sample throughput while decreasing time-to-results and labor costs during drug discovery and development.
As a Biochemical Automation Workflow Engineer, the candidate will be an integral part of an R&D team that develops automated sample preparation workflows on the AssayMAP and Bravo platforms and will be responsible for
• translating manual sample preparation processes defined by analytical chemists into equivalent or better automated processes for the AssayMAP and Bravo automated liquid handling platforms to create complete sample preparation applications.
• fine-tuning sample preparation applications in collaboration with analytical chemists to optimize workflow data quality and meet customer needs.
• creating intuitive user interfaces for sample preparation applications that allow analytical chemists to efficiently prepare samples for LC/MS analysis....cont.

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