Software Engineer - Cancer Genomics Cloud

Organization
Institute for Systems Biology
Job Location
Seattle, WA
Salary
Benefits
Job Description

The Institute for Systems Biology is seeking Software Engineers to join the lab of Dr. Shmulevich. Cancer research has entered the realm of Big Data. Large research studies are generating more data every day -- petabytes of data describing thousands of tumor samples. Our goal is to enable cancer research groups around the world to develop and test their algorithms on this data using a secure, distributed cloud platform. We are part of a pilot project to provide the cancer research community with flexible, programmatic, and interactive access to large heterogeneous datasets, the tools to analyze them, and the computational power to develop and test novel algorithms.

ISB is a unique organization positioned at the intersection of biology and technology, and is leading a team of a dozen or more research scientists and software engineers spanning three organizations to develop the Cancer Genomics Cloud. ISB is a nonprofit biomedical research organization where some of the world’s best scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians collaborate to drive scientific advancement and create breakthroughs in the areas of human health and environmental sustainability.

Come be a part of this fast-paced and exciting project. Join our team and help us solve grand challenges in cancer research. Bring your expertise in distributed systems, cloud technologies, data pipelines, algorithm development, and visualization wizardry to bear on an important facet of human health.

We are looking for candidates for several positions, including Lead Software Engineer/Architect, Distributed Storage and Database Engineer, Distributed Computation Engineer, Interactive Analysis Web Developer, Distributed Systems/Services Developer for Genomics, and Genomics Data Hacker.

For more information about these positions, please visit our website: http://shmulevich.systemsbiology.net/open-positions

Requirements

The project will make use of Python; Linux; distributed databases, including NoSQL technologies; and automated cloud architecture deployments. There will be substantial new development as well as work to port existing bioinformatics tools to the cloud. We are more concerned with identifying energetic, talented, dependable, and adaptable candidates rather than any specific technologies. Apply and let us know why you might be a good match!

How to Apply

To apply, please visit the ISB website: http://www.systemsbiology.org/open-positions

About Our Organization

About the Institute for Systems Biology

ISB is a premier, nonprofit research organization located in the heart of Seattle’s emerging biotech sector in South Lake Union, in Seattle, WA. Established as a non-traditional, multidisciplinary environment, ISB was co-founded in 2000 by Dr. Leroy Hood, a world-renowned systems biologist who was recently awarded the National Medal of Science. ISB pioneered systems biology, which harnesses and integrates the respective insights of biologists, geneticists, computer scientists, chemists, engineers, mathematicians, immunologists and others to answer some of society's most challenging questions related to health and the environment.

ISB employee benefits include flexible work arrangements and schedules, generous vacation and sick time, a 403(b) with matching contributions, health plans with 100% employer-paid premiums for employees, opportunities to attend and/or present at research conferences, and annual lab and Institute retreats.

ISB is an Equal Opportunity Employer (M/F/disability/veteran/minority status).

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