Senior Software Engineer (4956)

Organization
Qiagen
Job Location
Redwood City, CA
Job Description

- Design and develop cutting edge web applications and user interfaces.
- Design and develop high performance components/sub-systems for highly scalable service oriented NGS software.
- Assist in defining the appropriate data models, transformation technologies, and indexing/search algorithms for large-scale genomics data.
- Use best practices and architectural rigor during the software design process, providing input on alternative strategies and solutions.
- Write well-documented, extensible software code that is easy to maintain, and that adheres to generally accept programming standards and OOP practices.
- Own the overall quality of your code including unit testing, functional testing and performance.
- Produce and maintain technical designs and documentation relevant to assigned software development tasks.

Requirements

- 5+ years of developing web applications.
- Highly proficient in JAVA and strong understanding of multi-threaded programming.
- Excellent grasp of OOP concepts and design patterns.
- Experience analyzing and defining requirements, and translating them into technical specifications and architecture.
- Excellent knowledge of SaaS, SOA, OOP, Unix and Java development in a cross platform environment.
- Experience with Web Services (such as Spring and RESTful).
- Excellent knowledge of Continuous Development, Integration, and Deployment.
- Experience developing highly scalable, distributed backend services for web applications.
- Knowledge of scalability/performance issues and optimization techniques.

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