Senior Scientist, Diagnostic Products

Organization
Asuragen, Inc.
Job Location
2150 Woodward St.
Suite 100
Austin, TX 78744
Benefits

We invest in your well being: health and dental coverage, stock options for every employee, wellness initiatives, disability coverage, 401(k) plan, professional development and more.

Job Description

Asuragen is seeking an outstanding PhD-level scientist to design and launch molecular diagnostic products for genetic disease and cancer testing.  This position requires personal and technical leadership within Asuragen’s Diagnostic Product team to develop, verify and validate novel PCR- and NGS-based assays.  The role emphasizes cross-functional collaboration with research, bioinformatics, regulatory and manufacturing operations within a cGMP regulated environment.  Successful candidates will have the opportunity to lead successful deployments of molecular diagnostic products, coordinate with key opinion leaders, contribute to strategic initiatives and develop leadership and scientific skills that impact human health.  Candidates with specific experience in regulated product development, data analysis, next generation sequencing, design of experiments and FDA cleared products are encouraged to apply. 

Qualifications:

Candidates with the following qualifications are encouraged to apply:

  • A PhD degree in molecular biology, biochemistry, or related field with experience in multiplex PCR, Next-Gen sequencing and mutation analysis
  • A track record of creativity and productivity through multiple peer-reviewed publications
  • Direct experience with sample preparation and high-throughput data analysis
  • Communicates effectively intra- and interdepartmentally as well as outside the organization
  • Coordinates the development of project plans that require the concerted efforts of multiple stakeholders
  • Proactively identifies solutions that support project objectives
  • Recommends alterations to project plans based on technical results
  • Supports other scientists based on extensive knowledge in at least one technical field
  • Provides high-level data analysis and communicates these results to others inside and outside the organization
  • Independently assimilates results from multiple sources and provides reports to stakeholders within the organization
  • Provides support in specific scientific areas inside and outside the company
  • Supports the team through appropriate hiring, mentoring, and career development

Compliant with all laws and regulations associated with developing and manufacturing FDA-regulated products

About Our Organization

Asuragen is a global diagnostic products company delivering solutions that build knowledge and understanding of complex clinical questions. Asuragen’s application of its deep scientific heritage and molecular expertise delivers diagnostic products in oncology and genetics that provide the best answers with optimal workflows – so time can be spent delivering actionable insights, rather than searching for them. With innovative approaches to kit development and a broad range of molecular chemistries, Asuragen produces assays that ensure reproducible results. From discovery and development to regulatory support to global commercialization, we also provide a tailored approach that efficiently delivers custom and companion diagnostic products for our partners. Asuragen is located in Austin, Texas, which is consistently ranked in the top 10 of “best places to live” list of US cities. Asuragen offers a competitive salary, medical, dental, disability and life insurance, a 401(k) plan with company matching contributions, employee stock option plan, and a tuition reimbursement plan.

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