Senior Bioinformatician - cancer genomics

Organization
QIMR Berghoger Medical Research Institute
Job Location
300 Herston Road
Brisbane QLD 4006
Australia
Salary
AUD $86,499.56 to $102,622.22 per annum
Benefits
  • Salary Packaging
  • Bonus Superannuation
Job Description

The role involves working on the analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data with a specific focus on the interaction between the immune system and the cancer genome. The successful candidate will be required to:

  • Lead research projects
  • Develop and run established NGS and array analysis pipelines
  • Test and benchmark new and existing tools
  • Work with collaborators to help interpret data
Requirements

The role calls for an experienced and enthusiastic bioinformatician with the following skills:

  •  A tertiary qualification of PhD or equivalent or demonstrated skills in genomics and next generation sequence analysis
  •  Experience using the Linux/Unix Operating System
  •  Expert in R and/or Python or Perl or Java
  •  Excellent communication skills 
  •  Ability to work independently and lead projects
  •  A desire to work as part of a multi-disciplinary team 
  •  A track record in writing papers
About Our Organization

QIMR Berghofer is a world-leading translational medical research institute focused on improving health by developing new diagnostics, better treatments and prevention strategies, specifically in the areas of cancer, infectious diseases, mental health and chronic disorders. Based in Herston, Brisbane and working in close collaboration with clinicians and other research institutes, QIMR Berghofer is home to more than 600 scientists, students and support staff.

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