Scientist, Sequencing Development

Organization
New York Genome Center
Job Location
New York, NY 10013
Job Description

The New York Genome Center is seeking a talented, highly self-motivated, and team-oriented Scientist to join the Sequencing Development group and assist Sequencing Operations leadership in developing and implementing next-generation sequencing technologies and assays. The ideal candidate has a strong working knowledge of molecular biology and next-generation sequencing technology, including sample preparation and data interpretation. Requiring strong interpersonal and communication skills, this role will work on a cross-disciplinary team and collaborate closely with other teams to develop and implement innovative new technologies into production. The ability to thrive in a fast-paced and shifting environment is essential.

Responsibilities will include, but are not limited to:

  • Design and perform relevant experiments to evaluate and develop NGS-based assays;
  • Create innovative protocols for sample preparation for Illumina and other NGS platforms;
  • Contribute to troubleshooting and improving current laboratory methods;
  • Analyze, interpret and report scientific findings at NYGC-wide meetings and to senior management;
  • Perform custom, non-production assays, as needed;
  • Work with challenging sample types including FFPE, ultra low input, and single-cell derived DNA and RNA;
  • Assist the Manager in guiding and supporting members of the group;
  • Maintain a thorough knowledge of current scientific literature, and communicate relevant developments to members of the group;
  • Actively participate in lab meetings, share knowledge with the team, and help drive efforts toward the goal of developing robust, cutting edge NGS technologies.
Requirements
  • PhD in Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, or a related field;
  • Advanced theoretical and practical knowledge of next-generation sequencing, including a proven track record of developing new protocols, identifying/analyzing challenges and proposing solutions;
  • 3+ years of direct, hands-on experience with next-generation sequencing sample preparation workflows and applications – experience with difficult library preparation methods (Single-Cell RNA-Seq, WGBS-Seq, ATAC-Seq, etc.) preferred;
  • Some experience with NGS data analysis desired;
  • Excellent laboratory bench work and organizational skills, including strong time management, prioritization skills, and the ability to work independently with minimal supervision;
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills, as well as a strong predisposition towards collaboration.
How to Apply

To apply, visit http://nygenome.org/careers

About Our Organization

New York Genome Center (NYGC) is an independent, non-profit organization that leverages the collaborative resources of leading academic medical centers, research universities, and commercial organizations. Our vision is to transform medical research and clinical care in New York and beyond through the creation of one of the largest genomics facilities in North America, integrating sequencing, bioinformatics, and data management, as well as performing cutting-edge genomics research. 

The New York Genome Center is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment and will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age, disability, or protected veteran status. The New York Genome Center takes affirmative action in support of its policy to hire and advance in employment individuals who are minorities, women, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities.

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