Scientific Programmer for EMDataBank project

Organization
EMBL-EBI
Job Location
EMBL-EBI Wellcome Genome Campus
Hinxton
Cambridge
Cambridgeshire
CB10 1SD
United Kingdom
Salary
Competitive
Benefits

EMBL is an inclusive, equal opportunity employer offering attractive conditions and benefits appropriate to an international research organisation.

We have an informal culture, international working environment and excellent professional development opportunities but one of the really amazing things about us is the concentration of technical and scientific expertise – something you probably won’t find anywhere else.

If you’ve ever visited the campus you’ll have experienced first-hand our friendly, collegial and supportive atmosphere, set in the beautiful Cambridgeshire countryside. Our staff also enjoy excellent sports facilities including a gym, a free shuttle bus, an on-site nursery, cafés and restaurant and a library.

Job Description

We are seeking to recruit a Scientific Programmer to work on the EMDataBank project. You will join the Cellular Structure & 3D Bioimaging team at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) located at the Wellcome Genome Campus near Cambridge in the UK. 

EMBL-EBI is a world-leader in archival and dissemination of 3D biomacromolecular and cellular structure data. We accept and curate depositions of structural data for three global archives, PDB, EMDB and EMPIAR. We also maintain a number of databases that support advanced search, analysis and visualisation services for structural biologists and the wider scientific community.

The EMDB/EMPIAR team at EMBL-EBI plays a key role in the archival and dissemination of 3DEM data. In addition, we are part of the NIH-funded EMDataBank project with partners in the USA that aims to improve the validation methods, standards and practices in the field. For this project we are now looking to recruit a scientific programmer.

The post holder will work on several aspects of 3DEM validation project including:

a)     Further development of the 3DEM validation software pipeline that is used to generate validation reports during EMDB/PDB deposition.

b)     Further development of the stand-alone validation servers for the 3DEM community.

c)     Analysis of submissions for the EMDataBank Map and Model Challenges.

Requirements

Applicants should hold an MSc or PhD in physics, mathematics, (bio-)chemistry, biology or similar, involving the application of computational methods in the life sciences. Applicants should have at least two years work experience in bioinformatics or structural biology and at least one year experience in maintaining and developing software. Experience in Python programming and web-server development is desirable.

Excellent written and oral communication skills, fluency in English, ability to work in a team and with international collaborators, and attention to detail are required. The position may require occasional travel, mainly in the UK.

About Our Organization

At EMBL-EBI, we help scientists realise the potential of ‘big data’ in biology by enabling them to exploit complex information to make discoveries that benefit mankind. Working for EMBL-EBI gives you an opportunity to apply your skills and energy for the greater good. As part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), we are a non-profit, intergovernmental organisation funded by 22 member states and two associate member states and proud to be an equal-opportunity employer. We are located on the Wellcome Genome Campus near Cambridge in the UK, and our 600 staff are engineers, technicians, scientists and other professionals from all over the world.

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