Science Writer/Editor - Development Focus

Organization
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center & Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Job Location
Job Description

Job Summary
The Science Writer/Editor will collaborate with the Development and Communications & Marketing departments to execute the most effective benefactor-facing and stewardship content, translating complex science for a lay audience. The Writer/Editor will also help to seek out and tell the dynamic stories of the Hutch across all of the department's communications channels - including the public website, the quarterly glossy and digital magazine, the Intranet, the suite of digital newsletters and all social channels - as well as occasionally help with press releases for the Media Relations team and marketing materials.

The Science Writer/Editor will collaborate with designers, producers and web developers to ensure alignment for content and execution, as well as across the department with the Communications and Marketing teams. The Science Writer/Editor must be an efficient, elegant writer with deep experience in science writing, be a stickler for style and spelling, and have a passion for discovering and telling the stories of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, particularly for the private donor audience.

Please visit www.fhcrc/careers.org or click on the link below to apply: https://careers-fhcrc.icims.com/jobs/4856/science-writer-editor---develo...

NOTE: Please include a cover letter and at least three writing samples with your submission.

We are a VEVRAA Federal Contractor.

If interested, please apply online at http://track.tmpservice.com/ApplyClick.aspx?id=2171504-2647-421

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