Sales Coordinator (3307)

Organization
QIAGEN
Job Location
Germantown, MD
Salary
Benefits
Job Description

The Sales Coordinator’s primary responsibility is to provide support with non-sales activities i.e. CRM data entry, quotation writing, sample management, CRM reporting, liaison with Service Solutions, Technical Services and Regional Marketing. Pre/Post preparation of vendor shows/seminars support regarding announcements, supplies, and lead/attendance entry.

Requirements

Education:
● BS Science or equivalent preferred

Experience:
● Prior sales support or coordination experience in high-activity sales environment
● 1-3 years professional work experience strongly preferred
● Microsoft Office

Travel:
● Minimal travel required (up to 10%)

Interpersonal skills:

● Self-motivated with the ability to work independently while under guidance from manager
● Ability to work in teams
● Excellent time management and organizational skills
● Excellent listening, written and oral communication skills for all business levels

About Our Organization

As the innovative market and technology leader, QIAGEN creates sample and assay technologies that enable access to content from any biological sample.
Our mission is to enable our customers to achieve outstanding success and breakthroughs in life sciences, applied testing, pharma, and molecular diagnostics. We thereby make improvements in life possible.

Our commitment to the markets, customers, and patients we serve drives our innovation and leadership in all areas where our sample and assay technologies are required.

The exceptional talent, skill, and passion of our employees are key to QIAGEN’s excellence, success and value.

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