Research Scientist: Custom Panel Development (ADX025)

Organization
ArcherDX, Inc.
Job Location
2477 55th Street, Suite 202
Boulder, CO 80301
Salary
We offer competitive compensation and generous benefits programs.
Benefits

We offer competitive compensation and generous benefits programs. E-mail your résumé in confidence with salary requirements https://www.smartrecruiters.com/ArcherDX/82585301-field-applications-spe.... Equal Opportunity Employer.

Job Description

RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Help define panel content through literature and database searches
  • Design custom panels
  • Execute well-controlled experiments and analyze large NGS data sets.
  • Manage multiple projects at once to ensure that internal and external deadlines are met
  • Document experiments and results consistent with company standards
  • Effectively communicate/present experimental results and challenges to other team members

  

Requirements

EXPERIENCE

  • 2+ years relevant industry experience.
  • Experience with standard molecular biology techniques including PCR, qPCR, and primer design.
  • Experience with next-generation sequencing and library preparation a plus.
  • Experience with managing large data sets and analysis of next-generation sequencing data a plus.

 EDUCATION

  • PhD in Biochemistry or Molecular Biology
About Our Organization

ArcherDX, the NGS applications company, is developing and commercializing a novel approach to target enrichment chemistry. Next-generation sequencing technology based on Anchored Multiplexed PCR (AMP™) generates a highly enriched library of gene targets of interest for downstream genomic sequencing. Complemented by proprietary software and readily accessible reports, our technology enables dramatic enhancement in mutation detection speed as well as complex mutation identification and discovery.

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