Research Fellow in Molecular Toxicology

Organization
University of Birmingham
Job Location
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
United Kingdom
Salary
Full time starting salary is normally in the range £29,799 to £38,832. With potential progression once in post to £41,212 a year.
Job Description

To contribute to the achievement of the School of Biosciences’ research vision in translational molecular toxicology by undertaking specified research activities within a thriving and well-established collaboration with a team of scientists at Unilever. 

This post forms the central component of a research project with Unilever “Towards an integrated approach in defining the MoA / KE of chemicals”. As such the postholder will build upon some very large scale multi-omics studies (transcriptomics and metabolomics) that have recently investigated the effects of chemicals on the health of Daphnia magna, specifically with the goal to discover modes of action and putative key events. The postholder will focus on the translation of these putative key events into a robust mechanistic understanding of toxicity; and additionally to collaborate with scientists from Unilever to integrate this new knowledge into their chemical safety science. Significant opportunities exist to more deeply mine the wealth of omics data that has been generated within the earlier laboratory investigations. The role will be to conduct Daphnia toxicity exposure studies focusing on high resolution concentration-response studies, conducting targeted gene expression and metabolite assays, undertake extensive statistical analyses to build and characterise the key event relationships within an Adverse Outcome Pathway framework, and ultimately generate new knowledge in toxicology. 

Requirements

• PhD or equivalent experience in Molecular (Eco)Toxicology or a related discipline. 
• Experience in chemical exposure studies, ideally in vivo studies of aquatic organisms. 
• Experience in the measurement of gene expression and/or targeted metabolite analysis using LC-MS/MS approaches. 
• Experience in a range of univariate and multivariate statistical analysis methods. 
• Experience in managing multiple tasks simultaneously. 
• Excellent communication and interpersonal skills, including the ability to communicate complex information clearly. 
• A high level of accuracy and attention to detail. 
• Ability to work on own initiative, manage time effectively, progress tasks concurrently and work to deadlines. 
• Detailed knowledge of office safety. 
• Ability to assess resource requirements and use resources effectively. 

An analysis appearing in PeerJ finds that social media mentions of a paper may lead to increased citations.

NIH's Michael Lauer looks at the number of grants, their amount, and funding success rates at the agency for last year.

At Nature, Johns Hopkins' Gundula Bosch describes her graduate program that aims to get doctoral students thinking about the big picture.

Patricia Fara writes about childcare funding, and women in science and science history at NPR.