Research Associate, Template Prep

Organization
Pacific Biosciences
Job Location
1380 Willow Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025
Job Description

Pacific Biosciences seeks a Research Associate or Senior Research Associate with a strong technical molecular biology background to join the sample prep team.  This position will contribute to development of the up-front DNA preparation for Pacific Biosciences SMRT™ sequencing platform, as well as support of internal research efforts, by working with a team that is tasked with continuing innovation of the sample prep component of Pacific Biosciences single molecule real time DNA sequencing system.   The position primarily involves hands-on laboratory work in preparing templates for in-house experimentation.  The candidate will be working in a fast-paced, start-up environment, interacting with scientists and engineers with diverse backgrounds.

Key responsibilities include:
•    Hands-on laboratory work preparing samples and running the PacBio instruments.
•    Analysis, interpretation, and troubleshooting of experimental results.
•    Involves up to 4 hours of manual pipetting using single channel and/or multi-channel pipettors per day.

Requirements

•    Undergraduate degree in Biochemistry, Molecular Biology or related scientific field.  Associate degree with relevant experience also considered.
•    2 to 5 years of biochemistry and/or molecular biology laboratory research experience.
•    Technical proficiency in general laboratory practices, particularly biochemistry/molecular biology. 
•    Excellent record-keeping and careful attention-to-detail.
•    Strong presentation and communication skills.
•    Outstanding organizational and interpersonal skills.
•    Enjoy working closely with others as a member of an interdisciplinary team.
•    Prior experience in the biotechnology industry is a plus.
•    Prior hands-on experience in operating next-generation DNA sequencing instruments and assays are a plus.
•    Experience with R or other programming languages is a plus.

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