Research Associate, Production Development

Organization
Twist Bioscience
Job Location
San Francisco, CA
Job Description

 We are looking for motivated, enthusiastic individuals to join our Twist Bioscience Production Development Team in South San Francisco. Twist Bioscience is seeking a Research Associate interested in working at our exciting start-up located in South San Francisco.  The Research Associate will perform basic molecular biology workflows and will be responsible for the testing and analysis of a variety of custom gene products and building blocks to meet Twist production forecast and timelines. 

The candidate will support the production team’s custom DNA-based applications and assays for synthetic biology including high-throughput gene synthesis, high-throughput cloning processes, and NGS-based QC. The ideal candidate will be driven and will do what it takes to keep manufacturing on track in a fasted paced start-up environment. The ideal candidate will work independently, be very organized, have excellent molecular biology knowledge and skills, contribute to process improvement and documentation, and communicate effectively with peers and management. The candidate will also work with automation engineers on implementation of processes developed by the R&D team, and work with database engineers on LIMS development for data tracking.  

Requirements
  • B.S./M.S. in Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry or a closely-related field, and 2-8 years of relevant industrial experience in the field of molecular biology.
  • Must have strong background in molecular biology techniques including DNA purification, DNA quantification, PCR, enzymatic assays, and molecular cloning.
  • Excellent communication skills. Proficient in writing, and communicating in English. Able to present data effectively.
  • Experience with Automation is preferred but not required.
  • Experience with Next-Gen sequencing sample prep and data analysis is preferred.
  • Excellent experimental tracking skills.  Able to handle multiple experiments at once.  Experience working with a LIMS database is highly desired.
  • Excellent interpersonal skills. Respectful and open to other’s views; contribute to building a positive team spirit.
  • Excellent documentation skills. Able to prepare documents including data summaries, technical and analytical reports.
  • High attention to detail.
  • Comfortable working in a fast-paced environment.
  • Self-motivated and passionate about work.
How to Apply

To become part of this growing start up, please go to http://grnh.se/byelr61 and apply!

About Our Organization

At Twist Bioscience, our expertise is accelerating science and innovation by leveraging the power of scale. We have developed a proprietary semiconductor-based synthetic DNA manufacturing process featuring a 10,000-well high throughput silicon platform capable of producing synthetic biology tools, including genes, oligonucleotide pools and variant libraries. By synthesizing DNA on silicon instead of on traditional 96-well plastic plates, our platform overcomes the current inefficiencies of synthetic DNA production, and enables cost-effective, rapid, high-quality and high throughput synthetic gene production, which in turn, expedites the design, build, test cycle to enable personalized medicines, pharmaceuticals, sustainable chemical production, improved agriculture production, diagnostics, biodetection and data storage. For more information, please visit www.twistbioscience.com. Twist Bioscience is on Twitter. Sign up to follow our Twitter feed @TwistBioscience athttps://twitter.com/TwistBioscience.

Twist Bioscience is an equal opportunity employer.

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