Research Assistant (Bioinformatics)

Organization
Imperial College London
Job Location
South Kensington Campus
London
SW7 2AZ
United Kingdom
Salary
£29,800 - £32,970 p.a.
Job Description

Research Assistant – Bioinformatician

 

Cardiovascular Science

National Heart and Lung Institute

Royal Brompton Campus

Salary range: £29,800 – £32,970 per annum

Applications are invited for a 3-year research position in Cardiovascular Genetics and Genomics at Imperial College London. The research group spans the National Heart and Lung Institute and MRC Clinical Sciences Centre (CSC) at Imperial College London, and the Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit at Royal Brompton Hospital. The post is funded by a £1 million grant from the Wellcome Trust, and will be primarily based in our new state of the art facilities based at the Imperial College Royal Brompton Campus.                                                                                                                                      

We are looking for a talented computational biologist, preferably with experience in human genetics, to join our Cardiovascular Genetics & Genomics team.  Our research is aimed at understanding the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease, and particularly inherited heart diseases.  This is an excellent opportunity for a talented bioinformatician to further develop their career and make an important contribution in applied genomics.

You will be embedded in a well-established bioinformatics team, with independent primary responsibility for  a new project within our gene discovery and/or variant interpretation programmes.

This post is a full-time, fixed-term for three years.

Our preferred method of application is online via our website http://www.imperial.ac.uk/job-applicants/  (please select “Job Search” then enter the job title or vacancy reference number into “Keywords”). Please complete and upload an application form as directed.

Alternatively, if you are unable to apply online, please email rb.recruitment@imperial.ac.uk to request an application form.

Informal enquiries should be sent to j.ware@imperial.ac.uk

Job Reference: RB020-16

Closing Date: 20 March 2016

Imperial Managers lead by example. 

Committed to equality and valuing diversity.  We are also an Athena SWAN Silver Award winner, a Stonewall Diversity Champion, a Two Ticks Employer and are working in partnership with GIRES to promote respect for trans peopl

Requirements

 

You will need to be an experienced computational biologist, with at least a Masters in bioinformatics or a closely related discipline (or equivalent research, industrial or commercial experience), and a sound knowledge of genetics and genomics. You will join a vibrant new group, led by Dr James Ware, who is a recently-appointed principal investigator within the internationally-recognised Cardiovascular Genetics and Genomics group.  The group has a track record of excellence and innovation in cardiovascular genetics and computational genomics, with numerous publications in top-tier journals and extensive international collaboration. Applicants with a Masters will be encouraged to register for a PhD.  Post-doctoral researchers are also welcome to apply.

How to Apply

 

Our preferred method of application is online via our website http://www.imperial.ac.uk/job-applicants/  (please select “Job Search” then enter the job title or vacancy reference number into “Keywords”). Please complete and upload an application form as directed.

Alternatively, if you are unable to apply online, please email rb.recruitment@imperial.ac.uk to request an application form.

About Our Organization

Imperial College London is the only UK university to focus entirely on science, engineering, medicine and business. Our international reputation for excellence in teaching and research sees us consistently rated in the top 10 universities worldwide.

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