Research Analyst & Programmer (part time)

Organization
Stanford University School of Medicine
Job Location
300 Pasteur Drive
Stanford, CA 94305
Salary
$25-$30/per hour
Job Description

The Priest lab at the Stanford University School of Medicine is looking for a driven, energetic and creative individual with background in computer science or bioinformatics as a part-time research analyst to study the genetic basis of congenital heart disease (www.priestlab.org). The position would initially be funded half-time on an hourly basis.

This would be an ideal position for a recent college graduate looking to develop experience prior to applying to grad school or medical school. Excellent verbal and written communication skills are required, as is a willingness to work with colleagues with a broad array of backgrounds.

Requirements

A Bachelors Degree with a major or specialization in Bioinformatics, Computer Science, or a related field quantitative field is a prerequisite.

Fluency in Unix, Perl, Python and/or Java is essential, and experience with Google Cloud Architecture, statistical analysis of genotype-phenotype associations, or deep learning/computer vision techniques would be a bonus.

How to Apply

Please send an email with the subject "Analyst Position"  to [email protected] and include a CV and a personal statement describing relevant experience 

About Our Organization

The Division of Pediatric Cardiology and the Stanford University School of Medicine provide superlative training opportunities at the post-doctoral level in a highly stimulating and interactive environment.

Stanford University is an equal opportunity employer and minority applicants are encouraged to apply.

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