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Postdoctoral Positions in Computational Genomics

Organization
Weill Cornell Medicine, New York City
Job Location
Meyer Cancer Center
New York, NY 10065
United States
Benefits

You will be offered competitive salary (above NIH guidelines) and generous benefits.

WCM is an employer and educator recognized for valuing AA/EOE/M/F/Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities.

 

Job Description

Applications are invited for postdoctoral positions in the laboratory of Dr. Ekta Khurana (http://khuranalab.med.cornell.edu) at Weill Cornell Medicine (WCM) in New York City. The research focus of the lab is on cancer genomics. Successful applicants will lead exciting projects involving single-cell data analysis for understanding treatment resistance in cancer and use of cell-free DNA for early detection of cancer. They will have opportunities to collaborate with a diverse group of experimental and computational biologists. The Khurana lab has access to clinical data and patient samples at WCM and participates actively in many international genomics consortia. There will also be opportunities for wet lab research for interested candidates.

Requirements

A PhD in computational biology, bioinformatics, genomics or a related field is required. A strong computational background, proficiency in at least one programming language and knowledge of statistics are also required. Research experience in genomics is desirable.

How to Apply

Interested candidates should send a cover letter, CV and names of three references to Dr. Khurana (ekk2003@med.cornell.edu). Please put the word ‘Postdoc-Application-2019’ in the subject line of your email.

 

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