Postdoctoral Fellow

Organization
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard University
Job Location
Boston, MA
Job Description

One postdoctoral position in computational biology focused on single cell genomics is available in the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

The candidate will develop computational methods for analyzing single-cell transcriptomic and mass cytometry data, with the goals to identify novel cell-types with applications in stem cell biology and cancer immunotherapy. The candidate will have the opportunity to closely interact with basic biologists and clinical investigators at the Harvard Medical School and affiliated hospitals.

Requirements

The successful applicant should hold a doctoral degree or equivalent qualification in computational biology, (bio)statistics, computer science, or a similar field. Candidates holding a degree in biological/medical science are also welcome to apply if they have demonstrated experience in computational or statistical work.

Strong programming (in Python, R, Matlab, or C/C++) and communication skills are required. Previous experience in analysis, interpretation, and integration of genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic data is also required. Previous knowledge in single-cell biology is not required.

How to Apply

Interested applicants please send CV and at least two recommendation letters to Dr. Guo-Cheng Yuan (gcyuan at jimmy dot harvard dot edu).

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