Postdoctoral Associate in High Throughput Analysis of HIV Latency and Reactivation

Organization
University of Michigan
Job Location
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Job Description

Postdoctoral positions are available to join an interdisciplinary project at the interface of virology, immunology, and bioinformatics that combines T-cell biology andhigh-throughput sequencing to study HIV latency and reactivation. The position will be jointly supervised by Drs Alice Telesnitsky, Cheong-Hee Chang, and Jeffrey Kidd in the Departments of Microbiology & Immunology and Human Genetics at the University of Michigan Medical School. Successful applicants will thrive in an interdisciplinary environment that combines expertise in virology, immunology, genomics, and bioinformatics to address questions relevant to HIV latency. Applicants should have a strong background in molecular genetics or high-throughput sequencing technologies and possess a willingness to perform cross-cutting research and work with an interdisciplinary team.

Requirements

The applicant should have a Ph.D. in virology, immunology, genetics, molecular biology, or a related field.  Excellent written and oral communication skills are required, as is a willingness to work in a collaborative, interdisciplinary environment.  Informatics skills, and experience with high-throughput sequencing data, flow cytometry, or advanced molecular techniques are a bonus.

How to Apply

To apply, send a CV, cover letter describing your research experiences and ongoing research interests, and contact information for up to three references to Jeffrey Kidd at jmkidd@umich.edu

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