Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Quantitative Infectious Disease Methods

Organization
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center & Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Job Location
Seattle, WA
Job Description

Cures Start Here.
At Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, home to three Nobel laureates, interdisciplinary teams of world-renowned scientists seek new and innovative ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases. Fred Hutch's pioneering work in bone marrow transplantation led to the development of immunotherapy, which harnesses the power of the immune system to treat cancer. An independent, nonprofit research institute based in Seattle, Fred Hutch houses the nation's first and largest cancer prevention research program, as well as the clinical coordinating center of the Women's Health Initiative and the international headquarters of the HIV Vaccine Trials Network.

Careers Start Here.
We are seeking a post‐doctoral candidate for statistical methods in transmission analysis for acute and emerging infectious diseases is available. The research will develop new methods for analysis of household transmission studies and evaluation of vaccine effects. The position is available in the research group of Professor M. Elizabeth Halloran.

The research may involve integration of genomic data into the epidemiologic analyses and/or the use of network data to estimate transmission parameters and effects of vaccines in populations. The research will demand considerable intellectual independence and creativity.

The successful candidate should have a PhD in statistics, biostatistics, computer science, or some related field. The successful candidate should have advanced computational skills. The successful candidate should have excellent writing skills in English and the ability to communicate with diverse colleagues. The position is available immediately.

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