Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

Organization
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center & Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Job Location
Seattle, WA
Job Description

Cures Start Here.
At Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, home to three Nobel laureates, interdisciplinary teams of world-renowned scientists seek new and innovative ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases. Fred Hutch's pioneering work in bone marrow transplantation led to the development of immunotherapy, which harnesses the power of the immune system to treat cancer. An independent, nonprofit research institute based in Seattle, Fred Hutch houses the nation's first and largest cancer prevention research program, as well as the clinical coordinating center of the Women's Health Initiative and the international headquarters of the HIV Vaccine Trials Network.

Careers Start Here.
The Prlic lab at the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Research Division is recruiting a postdoctoral fellow to work on a project involving the study of T cell responses to infection or vaccination. The candidate must be responsible, organized, and self-motivated, and able to efficiently manage time and experiments. In addition, the candidate must be familiar with working with primary T cells as well as infectious agents and FACS analysis.

A PhD in immunology or cell biology and peer-reviewed, first author publications are required. Preference will be given to candidates with extensive experience in flow cytometry and working with microbial agents. The candidate must show initiative, the willingness to take up new skills and responsibilities, and be a team player. Must be willing to work with biohazardous/infectious agents (BSL2+) under carefully controlled conditions. Excellent attention to detail and the ability to work independently are essential to success in this position, as are good communication and organizational skills. Salary will be commensurate with (appropriate) experience.

To apply for this position, please CLICK HERE

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