PhD position – Functional Genomics and Computational Biology | GenomeWeb

PhD position – Functional Genomics and Computational Biology

Organization
University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)
Job Location
91058 Erlangen
Germany
Job Description

A three-year Ph.D. position (50% E 13 TV-L) is immediately available at the Department of Biology (http://www.bioinfo.nat.fau.de) at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany).

The focus of our research group is on understanding the functional aspects of the human genome in health and disease through the analysis of the different levels of information encoded in the sequence. Some of our publications include:

Taher et al., Sequence signatures extracted from proximal promoters can be used to predict distal enhancers, Genome Biology, 2013 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24156763).

R.P. Smith et al., Massively parallel decoding of mammalian regulatory sequences supports a flexible organizational model, Nat Genet, 2013 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23892608).

Requirements

We are looking for talented, highly motivated applicants with:

1. A master’s degree or equivalent within the field of biology, computational biology or related fields.

2. Familiarity with at least one common programming language.

3. Strong written and oral communication skills in English.

How to Apply

The position will remain open until filled. Please email applications to Leila Taher (funcgenfau@gmail.com) with the subject "PhD Position". An application package must contain the following documents in English (please, all in one PDF file):

1. A letter of interest.

2. A complete curriculum vitae.

3. Copies of transcripts

4. Names and contact information for 2-4 references. 

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