IRB Analyst

Organization
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center & Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Job Location
Seattle, WA
Job Description

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, home of three Nobel laureates, is an independent, nonprofit research institution dedicated to the development and advancement of biomedical research to eliminate cancer and other potentially fatal diseases. Recognized internationally for its pioneering work in bone-marrow transplantation, the Center's five scientific divisions collaborate to form a unique environment for conducting basic and applied science. The Hutchinson Center, in collaboration with its clinical and research partners, the University of Washington and Seattle Children's, is the only National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center in the Pacific Northwest. Join us and make a difference!

The Institutional Review Board (IRB) Analyst is an advocate for the protection, rights and dignity of people who are part of research studies at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Critical results for this position include:

- Comprehensive analysis of research studies for compliance with regulations, guidelines, and institutional policies.
- Efficient review processing support and documentation for all submissions
- Respectful, collaborative relationship with all stakeholders

- Comprehensive analysis of research studies for compliance with regulations, guidelines, and institutional policies.
- Review submissions for completeness and compliance, using screening forms, historical records, and other resources.
- Gather additional data as necessary from researchers, study staff, and others.
- Advise researchers of submission problems and suggest solutions.
- Advise and provide input to IRB Chair and other stakeholders regarding regulation rules and intent, compliance options and regulatory limits.
- Efficient review processing support and documentation for all submissions
- Develop agendas for, attend and provide input at monthly and emergency IRO meetings.
- Compose and internally route letters documenting unanticipated problems and compliance issues to federal agencies.
- Prepare e-Review agenda for all Full Review items, including cover sheets for hyperlinks, comments, and all other required components.
- Compose and internally route result letters that relay committee requests to investigators.
- Compose minutes for Full Review agendas.
- Perform reviews of study documents for completeness and consistency across study documents.
- Respectful, collaborative, relationships with all stakeholders
- Respond to IRB related questions and concerns initiated by stakeholders.
- Serve as liaison between the IRO and research study staff by exchanging information as part of the day-to-day processing of submissions.
- Share information with colleagues for group and individual learning within the IRO.
- Provide advice and support to the IRB Chair and stakeholders.

Minimum Qualifications:
- Bachelor's degree; and either two years Institutional Review/Human Subjects experience OR four years FHCRC experience in administrative support to research projects/grants; or equivalent combination of education and experience.
- Prior experince as an IRB analyst desired.
- Must demonstrate organizational and communication skills.
- Attention to detail required.
- Proficient in word processing and previous experience with MS office programs (MS word, Access, Excel) required.
- Certified IRB Professional (CIP) preferred.
- Ability to lift 25 pounds.
- Must be able to read a physical document.

We are a VEVRAA Federal Contractor.

If interested, please apply online at http://track.tmpservice.com/ApplyClick.aspx?id=2201390-2647-9521

Students whose classmates are interested in science are more likely to think about a career in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, a new study says.

CNBC reports that the genetic counseling field is expected to grow as personalized medicine becomes more common.

Gladys Kong writes at Fortune that her STEM background has helped her as a CEO.

Social scientists report that the image of the 'lone scientist' might be deterring US students from STEM careers.