Group Leader - Developmental Biology

Organization
EMBL
Job Location
Meyerhofstr.1
69117 Heidelberg
Germany
Salary
Grading 9
Job Description

The European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) is one of the highest ranked scientific research organisations in the world. The Headquarters Laboratory is located in Heidelberg (Germany), with additional sites in Grenoble (France), Hamburg (Germany), Hinxton (UK) and Monterotondo (Italy).

The Developmental Biology Unit studies the development of multicellular organisms. Research in the unit covers all levels, from the cellular to the whole organism, and is highly interdisciplinary, combining a wide range of approaches and innovative techniques, with special emphasis on quantitative and real-time imaging. Research in the unit is firmly embedded within the overall EMBL research environment, with extensive in-house collaborations and support from world-class services, including the gene core, transgenic, metabolomics and mass-spectrometry core facilities.

We are seeking outstanding candidates addressing fundamental principles of multicellular development across the entire spectrum of developmental biology. A focus on mechanistic studies using model organisms is desired; complementary simplified systems, such as organoid and stem cell systems, are welcome. Candidates with strong background and research using theoretical approaches are also encouraged to apply. There is the possibility to hire two group leaders in the present call.

EMBL fosters interdisciplinarity by providing a highly collaborative environment that benefits the research of all its scientists, including at the graduate, post-doctoral and group leader levels. EMBL generally hires group leaders early in their career and provides them with an ideally supportive and collegial environment in which to launch their first independent position and develop their ambitious and original research.

 

Further information about research in the Developmental Biology Unit and at EMBL can be found at the EMBL web page.

EMBL is an inclusive, equal opportunity employer offering attractive conditions and benefits appropriate to an international research organisation with a very collegial and family friendly atmosphere. The remuneration package comprises from a competitive salary, a comprehensive pension scheme, medical, educational and other social benefits, as well as financial support for relocation and installation, including family, and the availability of an excellent child care facility on campus.

Requirements

We are seeking outstanding candidates addressing fundamental principles of multicellular development across the entire spectrum of developmental biology. A focus on mechanistic studies using model organisms is desired; complementary simplified systems, such as organoid and stem cell systems, are welcome. Candidates with strong background and research using theoretical approaches are also encouraged to apply. There is the possibility to hire two group leaders in the present call.

How to Apply

Please apply online through www.embl.org/jobs

 Please include a cover letter, CV and a concise description of research interests & future research plans. Please also arrange for 3 letters of recommendation to be emailed to: references@embl.de at the latest by 18 October 2015.

About Our Organization

Further information about the position can be obtained from the Head of Unit, Anne Ephrussi (anne.ephrussi@embl.de).

 

Interviews are planned for 30 November, 1, 15, 16 and 17 December 2015.

Information on Group Leader appointments can be found under http://www.embl.org/gl_faq.

An initial contract of 5 years will be offered to the successful candidate. This is foreseen to be extended to a maximum of 9 years, subject to an external review.

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