Experimental Officer in Biostatistics and Metabolomics

Organization
University of Birmingham
Job Location
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
United Kingdom
Salary
Full time starting salary is normally in the range £29,301 to £38,183. With potential progression once in post to £40,523 a year.
Job Description

Phenome Centre-Birmingham is a new major centre for providing national capability in state-of-the-art metabolic phenotyping applied to stratified medicine. The post holder will contribute significantly to the day-to-day operation of the Phenome CentreBirmingham (PC-B) within the University of Birmingham, in particular by implementing an automated data processing pipeline, experimental design, and processing and statistical analysis of large scale MS and/or NMR based metabolomics datasets. In addition the post holder will collaborate with researchers within and external to the university (academic, industry, scientific instrument manufacturers), provide training and support in biostatistics, and undertake independent research.

Main Duties

● To develop and conduct computational and statistical analyses of metabolomics datasets within the Phenome Centre-Birmingham, in particular of MS and/or NMR datasets analysed by both univariate and multivariate techniques.

● Implement an automated analysis pipeline for MS and/or NMR based metabolomics datasets.

● To undertake independent research in computational metabolomics, to develop the workflows for managing and analysing metabolomics datasets, for example using Galaxy software.

● To develop and maintain the computer hardware and software associated with the metabolomics laboratory.

● To train and assist postdoctoral researchers and PhD students in biostatistical analyses of metabolomics datasets.

● To contribute to writing bids for research funding.

● Apply knowledge in a way which develops new intellectual understanding.

● Disseminate research findings for publication, research seminars, etc.

● Undertake management/administration arising from research.

● Collect research data; this may be through a variety of research methods, such as scientific experimentation, literature reviews, and research interviews.

● Present research outputs, including drafting academic publications or parts thereof, for example at seminars and as posters.

● Provide guidance, as required, to support staff and any students who may be assisting with the research.

● Deal with problems that may affect the achievement of research objectives and deadlines.

Requirements

● PhD or equivalent experience in Bioinformatics, Biostatistics, Chemometrics or Computational Biology (all with metabolomics or related specialism).

● Experience in the analysis of MS and/or NMR metabolomics datasets.

● Experience in statistical analyses, including multivariate and univariate methods.

● Experience in computer programming (e.g. python and R).

● Experience in workflows, e.g. Galaxy.

● Experience in managing multiple projects simultaneously.

● Good communication and interpersonal skills.

● A high level of accuracy and attention to detail.

● Ability to work on own initiative, manage time effectively, progress tasks concurrently and work to deadlines.

● Detailed knowledge of office safety

● Ability to communicate complex information clearly

● Fluency in relevant models, techniques or methods and ability to contribute to developing new ones

● Ability to assess resource requirements and use resources effectively

● Understanding of and ability to contribute to broader management/administration processes

How to Apply

To view the full Job Description, and to make an application, please visit the University of Birmingham jobs website.

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