Director, Sequencing Operations

Organization
Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine
Job Location
San Diego, CA
Salary
commensurate with experience
Benefits

Good benefits 

Job Description

The Director of Sequencing Operations will design, validate and lead a high throughput genomic lab.

He/She will have: knowledge and experience with complex information and data systems and an understanding of the evolving academic science marketplace, as well as proven experience in the supervision of administrative, support, faculty and student personnel.

He/She will manage day-to-day operations including logistics, ordering, quality control and training. (Deliver P&L by establishing clear objectives, implementing appropriate performance metrics and executing on those strategies.)

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Requirements

Must have experience in running a high throughput genomic lab.

Five to eight years of progressively responsible leadership and management experience, in a university, academic health center, or research enterprise, to include operations, planning, budgeting, strategy, and communications involving matrixed functions. He/She must have a track record of incorporating process engineering in running the lab.

 He/She must have 5-8 years of experience in the following areas:

  • Whole genome sequencing protocol
  • NGS workflow
  • hands on next gen sequencing
  • sample collection, DNA extraction, Library prep and sequencing
  • Robotics/automation
  • LIMS
About Our Organization

Bente Hansen & Associates is a retained executive search firm focusing on the life science industry.

For more information, visit our website: www.bentehansen.com 

 

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