Diagnostic Product Development Scientist II

Organization
NanoString Technologies
Job Location
530 Fairview Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109
Salary
Competitive Comp Package
Benefits

ESPP, Healthcare, Stock Options, Matching 401K, 22 Day PTO, Wellness Reimbursement, and much more...

Job Description

Job Summary:

NanoString Technologies is seeking an experienced Scientist to join our Diagnostics Development team.  This individual will work with a cross functional team to develop new molecular diagnostic and companion diagnostic products with a particular focus in Oncology.  This individual will be responsible for developing and validating novel diagnostic gene signature assays on the nCounter Dx Analysis System.  This individual will be required to design experiments to test gene signature assays and analyze genomics/gene expression data, write test plans and reports, and work cross functionally to transfer reagents and assay testing procedures to a production or clinical environment.  This individual also will be required to use molecular biology techniques to develop new molecular diagnostic reagents.  This individual will be expected to provide technical leadership and communicate results to the cross functional team, as well as contribute as an individual researcher.

Essential Functions:

  • Use molecular biology techniques to develop and validate new molecular diagnostic reagents for use in diagnostic gene signature assays
  • Design experiments to test the sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of new diagnostic gene signature assays
  • Analyze genomics data  
  • Present data both within and outside of the organization and write test plans and reports
  • Develop assay procedures required for new gene signature assays
  • Work as part of cross functional team to deliver new diagnostic products on tight timelines

 

 

Requirements
  • Ph.D. in molecular biology, biochemistry, bioengineering, or related field with a minimum of six years of relevant post-doctoral or work experience, or an M.S. with commensurate relevant work experience.
  • Extensive knowledge of state-of-the-art molecular biology and nucleic acid hybridization techniques (i.e., gene expression analysis, NGS, or Q-PCR assays)
  • Prior experience developing Dx or CDx assays is highly preferred
  • Prior experience working in an ISO certified or QSR certified facility and experience developing products for the life sciences and/or molecular diagnostics industries is also preferred
  • Strong analytical and organizational skills exemplified by clear oral presentations and written documentation
  • Familiarity with software tools used for the analysis of gene expression data
About Our Organization

NanoString Technologies (NASDAQ: NSTG) is a publicly held provider of life science tools for translational research and molecular diagnostics. The company's technology enables a wide variety of basic research, translational medicine and in vitro diagnostics applications.

NanoString's products are based on a novel digital molecular barcoding technology invented at the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) in Seattle under direction of Dr. Leroy Hood. The company was founded in 2003 with an exclusive license to develop and market the technology. In 2008, NanoString launched its first commercial instrument system and began international sales operations with its first multiplexed assays for gene expression analysis. In 2010, the company launched new applications for the system to support microRNA analysis and copy number variation detection, and in 2013 launched Prosigna®, its first in vitro diagnostic product for prognosis of early stage breast cancer.

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