Developer - Bioinformatics Applications

Organization
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Job Location
Boston, MA
Job Description

The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI)/Partners Healthcare Clinical & Translational Informatics (CTI) group is the Institute’s resource for providing databases and applications that help DFCI clinicians and researchers gain insights based on clinical and research data. The Research Application Programmer will be tasked with performing technical feasibility assessments and proof of concepts for the initial phases of a Clinical Research Information System (CRIS) platform. This will require laying a basic technical foundation for the end product by creating a basic database schema, hooking up to vendor applications, and more. Afterwards, responsibilities will encompass the development of a new application using modern technologies (e.g. the MEAN stack) to create a responsive tool that drives genomic phenotyping and cancer research forward. The incumbent will report to the Team Lead for Bioinformatics and Business Analysis, working closely under the supervision of the Senior Clinical Research Analyst.

Requirements
  • Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science,  Bioinformatics or related field.
  • 2+ years experience with databases and RESTful APIs.
  • 2+ years experience with software development in Java, JavaScript, Bootstrap, Angular, etc.
  • 0-3 years of health care IT experience; experience with open source systems preferred, particularly REDCap and i2b2.
  • A combination of education and experience may be substituted for requirements
How to Apply

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