Computational Biologist

Organization
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Job Location
Dallas, TX 75390
Salary
DOE
Job Description

Computational Biologist
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Dallas, Texas

 

Join us at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas as a Computational Biologist where you will be part of our innovative Translational Bioinformatics Initiative within our renown Department of Clinical Sciences. Here you will join an active and expanding bioinformatics research effort that includes the Division of Biomedical Informatics and the Quantitative Biomedical Research Center. Our research mission is focused on addressing research questions across the spectrum of biology and medicine through the development of novel computational methods that solve challenging problems in the collection, management, analysis and interpretation of biomedical and clinical data.

 

As our Computational Biologist, you will support our scientific research using your technical knowledge of software, software development, networking and hardware in a complex computing environment. You will perform complex data analysis, develop or modify software to support new and ongoing research projects, develop and maintain complex databases to support our research, as well as train staff in the use of pertinent research systems.

 

There are two research areas of prime interest. One involves VDJServer, a web-accessible data repository and analysis server for high throughput sequencing data obtained from antigen receptor gene rearrangements. You will focus on algorithm and software development for standard and novel approaches to analyzing antigen receptor repertoires. The other involves Infectious Disease Ontology, a suite of interoperable ontology modules for the infectious disease domain being developed within the framework of the Open Biomedical Ontologies Foundry.

 

Qualifications:
Must be a highly motivated individual. Requires a Master’s degree in Computer Science or a related field of biological science; or a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science or a related field of biological science, and 2 years related research experience in bioinformatics and computational biology. Prefer a subject matter expert in multiple areas of computing technology with specific knowledge of molecular biology and genetics.

 

For our Antigen Receptor Gene research area, successful applicants will have experience with the analysis of high throughput sequencing data and high competency programming in C++ and either PERL or Python.

 

For our Infectious Disease Ontology project, successful applicants will be domain experts for ontology curation or have experience in logic, computational inference, and/or semantic web technologies. Applicants should have an interest in innovative, computational applications of ontologies to the study of immunology and infectious diseases.

 

Company Overview:
At UT Southwestern, you will be part of an amazing team at a nationally recognized and dynamic academic medical center where education, research and great medical care come together.

 

We offer excellent benefits and a supportive, culturally diverse environment. UT Southwestern is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women, minorities, veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. We are the future of medicine, today.

 

Contact:
To be considered for this position, please submit a CV and two letters of reference as pdf attachments to Suzette Swoverland at [email protected]. Find out more about our Translational Bioinformatic Initiative at (http://tinyurl.com/UTSW-TBI).

How to Apply

See Job Description

About Our Organization

UT Southwestern Medical Center

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