Chemist II

Organization
TriLink Biotechnologies
Job Location
9955 Mesa Rim Rd.
San Diego, CA 92121
Job Description

TriLink Biotechnologies is seeking a Chemist II.
This role is for an 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. shift, Sunday through Thursday.This position will be responsible for routine testing in additional to providing daily technical support in a fast pace high throughput biotech-manufacturing environment. The successful candidate will thrive in a collaborative team environment, as well as independently. They will serve as a technical expert in the lab and support the lab for all equipment and method related needs. Responsibilities include:

  • Bench-top testing of manufactured in-process and finished goods.
  • Performs routine to complex laboratory analyses and experiments with little to no supervision.
  • Routinely operate HPLC, Spectramaxes, and Automated Liquid Handling systems
  • Maintains instrument logs
  • Calibrate, operate, and perform minor maintenance of instrumentation per SOP
  • Ensures adherence to safe work practices and procedures
  • Coordinate, prioritize and plan lab tasks to meet deadlines with supervisor or manager
  • Monitor and report progress of analytical tests to supervisor or designee on regular basis

Qualifications

  • B.S. or advanced degree in chemistry or a related science required
  • Strong GMP and GLP background is highly desirable.
  • Typically requires 2 to 4 years of related experience.

TriLink Biotechnologies is a rapidly growing biotech firm in San Diego, CA that offers competitive wages and a full benefit package including medical, dental, vision, LTD, and a retirement plan. 

How to Apply

please email resume to:  hr@trilinkbiotech.com

A National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report calls for changing metrics to make STEM graduate school more student-centered, according to Science.

Two postdocs and a PhD hosted a panel discussion at Memorial Sloan Kettering on career advancement in science and what researchers can expect when they leave the lab.

An analysis of speakers at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting finds that women are less likely to be invited to talk, according to the Guardian.

An analysis appearing in PeerJ finds that social media mentions of a paper may lead to increased citations.