BIOINFORMATICS SCIENTIST - GENOTYPING PROJECTS

Organization
ArcherDX
Job Location
2477 55th Street, Suite 202
Boulder, CO 80301
Job Description
  • Build bioinformatics tools for calling genotypes in Next-Generation Sequencing data (SNP/INDEL calling, CNV, Haplotyping, RNA Differential Expression, etc)
  • Keep up to date with relevant research by critically examining the latest research in genotyping algorithms
  • Choose appropriate algorithms from existing open source tools and developing novel or adapting existing tools when needed
  • Build in-silico models of our PCR based assay to be used for validation and to assist in algorithm development
Requirements

Required Skills:

  • Excellent understanding of algorithm complexity and its implication in real-time performance 
  • Ability to read and understand complex scientific papers describing genotyping algorithms
  • Strong understanding of statistical modeling of genotyping data
  • Experience with solving genotyping problems in Cancer is a plus 
  • Strong software engineering skills is a plus 
  • Experience with machine learning and statistics is a big plus.

Key Technologies and Roles: Python, NGS, Genotyping, Bioinformatics, Algorithm Development

Education: BS or better preferred.

About Our Organization

ArcherDX, the NGS applications company, is developing and commercializing a novel approach to target enrichment chemistry. Next-generation sequencing technology based on Anchored Multiplexed PCR (AMP™) generates a highly enriched library of gene targets of interest for downstream genomic sequencing. Complemented by proprietary software and readily accessible reports, our technology enables dramatic enhancement in mutation detection speed as well as complex mutation identification and discovery.

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