Bioinformatics Postdoctoral Research Fellowship

Organization
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Job Location
100 Bureau Dr.
Gaithersburg, MD 20899
Salary
$66,919
Benefits

Full federal employee benefits

Job Description

NIST has open positions for postdocs to work toward developing the critical resources that will let genomics continue to scale and meet its promise in clinical applications. 

The National Research Council sponsors competitive (~10% acceptance rate) 2-year postdoctoral fellowships at NIST, and we are recruiting candidates for positions in the Genome-Scale Measurements group. The opportunity is described at: http://nrc58.nas.edu/RAPLab10/Opportunity/Opportunity.aspx?LabCode=50&ROPCD=506441&RONum=B7844. Proposal deadlines are biannual, on August 1 and February 1. We would welcome proposals for the August 1, 2015 deadline. Please feel free to have candidates contact us directly.

Our group has hosted the Genome in a Bottle Consortium to create well-characterized human genomes as NIST Reference Materials (see http://tinyurl.com/giabpilot,  http://www.genomeinabottle.org and http://go.nature.com/utlGz6).  These genomes are being rapidly adopted for benchmarking by clinical and research labs (e.g., see https://scholar.google.com/scholar?oi=bibs&hl=en&cites=2229422087673203010). These reference material genomes are also being to develop, refine, and optimize new sequencing technologies and methods.

Proposals could address a near-term opportunity using the unique collection of human sequencing data we are collecting on a trio as part of the Genome in a Bottle Consortium, including 130x PacBio, 900x Illumina, moleculo, 10X Genomics, mate-pair, Complete Genomics, Ion, Oxford Nanopore, and BioNano mapping.  A proposal might describe the best-possible assemblies and characterization of this family trio, including small variants, structural variants, and phasing.  Alternate proposals might describe use of the well-characterized genomes and machine learning to understand performance of different sequencing and bioinformatics methods to understand biases in any sequenced genome. This could build on benchmarking work like the GCAT tool (http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150225/ncomms7275/full/ncomms7275.html) being done with the Benchmarking Team we chair in the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health.  We welcome all proposals related to this work, as well as other ideas related to improving and assessing performance of genomics measurements and precision medicine.

Requirements

Applicants must be US Citizens at the time of application (permanent residency is not sufficient). Salary will be approximately $66,919.  The postdoc would preferably be located at NIST headquarters in Gaithersburg, MD, but might also be located with NIST on the Stanford University campus in Palo Alto, CA.

How to Apply

The next proposal deadline is August 1 for a start date in late 2015 through mid-2016, but there may be a possibility to start earlier in 2015, so please contact Justin Zook ([email protected]) and Marc Salit ([email protected]) if you are interested in applying for this position.  The postdoctoral opportunity description is at http://nrc58.nas.edu/RAPLab10/Opportunity/Opportunity.aspx?LabCode=50&ROPCD=506441&RONum=B7844

About Our Organization

NIST's Postdoctoral Program supports a nationwide competitive postdoctoral program administered in cooperation with the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council. The postdoctoral program brings research scientists and engineers of unusual promise and ability to perform advanced research related to the NIST mission, introduces the latest university research results and techniques to NIST scientific programs, strengthens mutual communication with university researchers, shares NIST unique research facilities with the U.S. scientific and engineering communities, and provides a valuable mechanism for the transfer of research results from NIST to the scientific and engineering communities.

http://www.nist.gov/iaao/postdoc.cfm

New study finds bias against female lecturers among student course evaluations, the Economist reports.

A research duo finds that science and technology graduate students who turn away from academic careers do so because of changes in their own interests.

Students whose classmates are interested in science are more likely to think about a career in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, a new study says.

CNBC reports that the genetic counseling field is expected to grow as personalized medicine becomes more common.