Associate Research Scientist

Organization
Columbia University Medical Center/Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center
Job Location
1130 St. Nicholas Avenue
New York, NY 10032
Job Description

The Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center (HICCC) is seeking an Associate Research Scientist to support the bioinformatics operations of the Biomedical Informatics Shared Resource (BISR) and the Columbia University JP Sulzberger Genome Center (CGC). The BISR (http://www.hiccc.columbia.edu/research/sharedresources/) supports the computational biology and bioinformatics needs of HICCC investigators on a wide range of projects in the areas of Cancer Research, including the analysis of gene expression, polymorphism, sequence, microRNA, and epigenomics data. The CGC (http://genome.columbia.edu) is equipped with state-of-the-art high-throughput sequencing instruments and has extensive collaborations with investigators at Columbia University working on biology, human diseases, and precision medicine.

The candidate will be expected to work with scientists to understand project requirements and to provide advice and guidance on bioinformatics solutions. As a result, he or she must possess excellent interpersonal and communication skills. The candidate may also work with programming staff in designing and implementing larger scale solutions for specific projects. BISR projects will involve the analysis of microarray and RNA-Seq gene expression data, including differential expression analysis, pathway enrichment analysis, computational methods for supervised and unsupervised learning, as well as integrative approaches utilizing systems biology methods. CGC projects will involve improving and maintaining a robust and highly automated computational pipeline for analyzing RNA-Seq and genome sequencing data; improving quality control procedures and interpreting quality control metrics for optimizing high-throughput sequencing experiments; and leading data analysis in strategic collaborations, including new technology development and human disease studies.

The successful candidate must be able to work and thrive at the interface between laboratory science and computational biology. Applicants should have a good working knowledge of a variety of platforms for genomic data analysis. The ideal candidate will be able to complement this experience with programming skills to extend existing tools and develop new tools as needed.

Minimum Qualifications
• PhD in Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, Genetics, or equivalent field.
• Experience in the analysis of next generation sequencing data.
• Fluency with R/Bioconductor at with at least one general-purpose programming language such as Python.
• Excellent communication skills and ability to work as member of a team.
• Strong creative thinking and organizational skills with demonstrated experience in problem solving and programming for bioinformatics projects.

Preferred Qualifications
Working knowledge of Java, Perl and/or C++ is a plus. Experience working with a relational database system such as MySQL would be very helpful.

You may submit application directly through academicjobs.columbia.edu and search by Requisition # 0006503 or by using the quicklink provided: academicjobs.columbia.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=62335

Columbia University is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer…

 

Requirements

Minimum Qualifications
• PhD in Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, Genetics, or equivalent field.
• Experience in the analysis of next generation sequencing data.
• Fluency with R/Bioconductor at with at least one general-purpose programming language such as Python.
• Excellent communication skills and ability to work as member of a team.
• Strong creative thinking and organizational skills with demonstrated experience in problem solving and programming for bioinformatics projects.

How to Apply

You may submit application directly through academicjobs.columbia.edu and search by Requisition # 0006503 or by using the quicklink provided: academicjobs.columbia.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=62335

A part of the proposed tax bill in the US could make tuition waivers taxable, Vox reports.

The New York Times reports that only a subset of STEM worker are in demand.

US News & World Report says students pursuing STEM degrees should consider what they are getting into.

New study finds bias against female lecturers among student course evaluations, the Economist reports.